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I just installed the series one Team Z rear suspension kit in my 89 mustang (uppers with relocation bracket, double adj lowers and ARB) What should me pinion angle be set at? Car weighs 3550, turbo car with a 4r70W on Radial pros. Can went 9.2 @ 148 last year on old suspension. Thanks
 

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Considering that the control arms have spherical rod ends and that there is no real deflection in them, I would not have more than 1* pinion down angle.
 

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I put mine at the same, but opposite as the engine.
 

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look at tim mcamis pinion angle video on youtube.

Most people dont' know what pinion angle really is. Tim explains it, and quite well.

Best advice I ever got for measuring pinion angle is to take the drive shaft out and toss it into the next county. Of course don't forget where you tossed it because it has to go back in. Then you can measure your angle and adjust as needed, without the shaft in the way it's a LOT easier.
 

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look at tim mcamis pinion angle video on youtube.

Most people dont' know what pinion angle really is. Tim explains it, and quite well.

Best advice I ever got for measuring pinion angle is to take the drive shaft out and toss it into the next county. Of course don't forget where you tossed it because it has to go back in. Then you can measure your angle and adjust as needed, without the shaft in the way it's a LOT easier.
Nice video. My only question is why no mention of working angle? It seems that some preach it and others don't. Team Z has a similar video and they don't reference the working angle of the U joint either. Maybe the working angle only applies to cars that are not dedicated race cars?
 

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because the working angles are really not relevant as long as they're somewhat close to zero, like +/- 8 degrees or so. As long as the two angles (front u joint working angle and the rear u-joint working angle) are similar +/- 4 degrees, give or take it's fine. The two opposing angles are what cancel out any vibrations.
 

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because the working angles are really not relevant as long as they're somewhat close to zero, like +/- 8 degrees or so. As long as the two angles (front u joint working angle and the rear u-joint working angle) are similar +/- 4 degrees, give or take it's fine. The two opposing angles are what cancel out any vibrations.
+/- 8 degrees?
Here's a link that Jack Hidley references to. It states the difference in the two working angles should be no less than 1/2* .

Measuring propshaft Angles
 

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the working angle I referred to is the difference between the drive shaft's angle and one of the two shafts, be it the transmission or the pinion (one not both). The critical angle is the difference between the two. They ideally should be the same, in a pure drag racing application, zero under a load. Therein lies the issue, because the rear end has to move up/down with the suspension and that changes the rear working angle. I call it the dynamic working angle. Also to a much lesser extent, chassis flex will change the front working angle.

So you level your car front to rear, measure the angle of the transmission output shaft. Let's say it's 4° up (rear higher than front). Then you move to the pinion flange and measure that angle. Let's say that's 4° down. Your pinion angle is then 0°. If the pinion flange was 3° down, your pinion angle would be 1.

8 is about the limit in my own experience with the old 4wd stuff. If you get much more than that, you're going to eat universals quickly. Many don't consider that stuff when lifting, they just want it to look nice and it does, but it comes at a cost. More maintenance.

this stuff is where folks get into trouble sometimes, and I'm not immune. I had to learn too. My junk is a true four link and the pinion angle does not change much with suspension travel, thus I leave it around 0.5°. For the longest I always thought pinion angle was the angle of the pinion gear in relation to the ground, and everyone told me it was supposed to be about 4° down, so that's how I ran it. Always had a vibration, not severe but it made you think when you crossed the finish line, is it going to get me to the ET shack before falling out? Couple years ago I was studying it and thinking 4 deg down ain't right, it's dependend on the front angle too. So I did some adjusting. Smooth as silk now, no ET or MPH improvement but a lot more comfortable. Pretty close to driving my friend's Comp Eliminator car--which is a dream to drive, kinda busy with the shifting, RPM, brake pressure, etc, but it drives wonderfully.
 

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the working angle I referred to is the difference between the drive shaft's angle and one of the two shafts, be it the transmission or the pinion (one not both). The critical angle is the difference between the two. They ideally should be the same, in a pure drag racing application, zero under a load. Therein lies the issue, because the rear end has to move up/down with the suspension and that changes the rear working angle. I call it the dynamic working angle. Also to a much lesser extent, chassis flex will change the front working angle.

So you level your car front to rear, measure the angle of the transmission output shaft. Let's say it's 4° up (rear higher than front). Then you move to the pinion flange and measure that angle. Let's say that's 4° down. Your pinion angle is then 0°. If the pinion flange was 3° down, your pinion angle would be 1.

8 is about the limit in my own experience with the old 4wd stuff. If you get much more than that, you're going to eat universals quickly. Many don't consider that stuff when lifting, they just want it to look nice and it does, but it comes at a cost. More maintenance.

this stuff is where folks get into trouble sometimes, and I'm not immune. I had to learn too. My junk is a true four link and the pinion angle does not change much with suspension travel, thus I leave it around 0.5°. For the longest I always thought pinion angle was the angle of the pinion gear in relation to the ground, and everyone told me it was supposed to be about 4° down, so that's how I ran it. Always had a vibration, not severe but it made you think when you crossed the finish line, is it going to get me to the ET shack before falling out? Couple years ago I was studying it and thinking 4 deg down ain't right, it's dependend on the front angle too. So I did some adjusting. Smooth as silk now, no ET or MPH improvement but a lot more comfortable. Pretty close to driving my friend's Comp Eliminator car--which is a dream to drive, kinda busy with the shifting, RPM, brake pressure, etc, but it drives wonderfully.
Thanks for the great explanation. I learned something there and the light bulb went off. Not easy to do in my senior years. :D
 
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