Ford Mustang Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just for 110 volt wall plug power, and exhaust tubing (but as versatile as possible, I'd like to be able to add aluminum jobs)

I was look for some decent deals, came across ALOT of choices.
Anything wrong with these choices for Mig welding?

The sears unit includes ALOT of stuff, for a really good price($310).

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=34099&item=3105875161


The Lincoln electric (Weld Pak 3200hd) seems to be very versatile, with a bit more power, and a little bit higher price ($385)
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Catalog/equipmentdatasheet.asp?p=7112&isolocale=EN


I like the Millermatic 135, but the cheapest price I could find was around $500.00

http://www.millerwelds.com/main/products/mig/M10501/

Of course the easier to use, the better it will make my welding look, since I'll be learning from scratch :)

I have no idea, one advantage from the next, thanks for any insight.

-Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
IMHO, i wouldn't waste the money on the craftsman unit - but i don't like to buy crappy tools! here are my opinions:

using a mig for aluminum jobs you'll need to buy a spool gun, so make sure your welder has an optional spool gun available.

make sure you go to a 75/25 co2/ar mix - and a solid wire - it'll make your welds 100% better.

i'd highly recommend getting an autodarkening helmet, speedglass is good - if you're a beginner welder, it makes EVERYTHING much easier.

both miller and lincoln are good - the lincolns tend to have better drive rollers, but it really boils down to personal preference, ford vs chevy, etc...

your links don't work for me - but i'd recommend any of the following in that price range:

both the millermatic 135 and 175 w/ economy cart @ cyberweld are excellent deals - 175 is better if you ever plan on welding thicker material.

both the lincoln sp135 and sp175 are equivalent to the above.

weld-pak is a home depot version w/ a lower duty cycle.

just remember - buy bigger than you think you'll need. i have a powermig 200, and wish i had went w/ the 255.

good luck!

check brwelder and cyberweld for good prices on units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,107 Posts
MIG Welding

Speaking as a 12 year CWI (Certified Welding Inspector) and
from a fair amount of mig experience myself, I totally agree, buy
the best you can afford! I've got a lincoln, but caught the 220v unit on sale - same size as the 110v. REALLY like it. I've used Millers and they just don't seem to be as smooth or stable as the Lincoln, but then again back to personal preference. I know they are also quality units. Also agree on the speedglas - shop around, I got one for $100, just the basic model. MAJOR help in tight quarters and "small" work. You'll want to run the smallest solid wire you can get, like the .024 they mention, for the exhaust stuff. Straight CO2 spatters a little more than 75/25, but doesn't penetrate as far which is good for the real thin stuff. However, I use 75/25 with no problem on exhaust. Just turn it down per instructions, and just weld a little spot at a time and let it cool for a few seconds, then do another spot. Won't melt thru with a little practice. One thing to consider - the Lincoln has an optional adapter to turn it into a "stitch" welder for sheet metal. Just a timer that turns the current on/off, can be adjusted, prevents warping. I also figured out how to adapt it to a TIG welder - email me if interested. [email protected] But you need to buy the TIG rig. With the 220 volt unit, I can use .035 Dualshield flux core which penetrates better and makes a bit of a stronger weld on heavy stuff than the Innershield. I found 10 lb spools I think it was Esab the only brand that made it in that size spool in .035". (Dual shield also uses a gas shield in addition to the flux core, Innershield does not. Innershield works better outdoors in a breeze.) I just wired up a 200v dryer plug for mine. Yes, you'd need a spool gun for aluminum, should be able to fit one to any of the good units. Check with the dealer. TIG is actually better for aluminum - it's VERY difficult to MIG weld aluminum except absolutely flat position. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Speaking as a 12 year CWI (Certified Welding Inspector) and
from a fair amount of mig experience myself, I totally agree, buy
the best you can afford!
yep. i think it's important to remember that for some, this is addictive! at first, i only wanted a welder for exhaust and small fab work. now, i'm building rollcages, bumpers, welding subframes, and general fab work - definitely glad i got the larger unit. buy the best unit you can afford, and keep it for the next 30 years.

I've got a lincoln, but caught the 220v unit on sale - same size as the 110v. REALLY like it. I've used Millers and they just don't seem to be as smooth or stable as the Lincoln, but then again back to personal preference.
i completely agree - that was my impression as well.

I know they are also quality units. Also agree on the speedglas - shop around, I got one for $100, just the basic model. MAJOR help in tight quarters and "small" work.
that'd be the speedglass "utility" - excellent litttle helmet. i got the 9000x, but only because i had a friend at airgas that got me a great deal.


You'll want to run the smallest solid wire you can get, like the .024 they mention, for the exhaust stuff. Straight CO2 spatters a little more than 75/25, but doesn't penetrate as far which is good for the real thin stuff. However, I use 75/25 with no problem on exhaust. Just turn it down per instructions, and just weld a little spot at a time and let it cool for a few seconds, then do another spot. Won't melt thru with a little practice.
i actually had problems welding w/ the .024 on exhaust - i found it easier to weld w/ the .030 - but i'm far from a professional welder! i generally stick w/ the .030 for most work, .035 for heavier work (bumpers, skidplates, etc), and for really heavy work, i go w/ the dual shield .042 - little messier, but dang does it penetrate!


One thing to consider - the Lincoln has an optional adapter to turn it into a "stitch" welder for sheet metal. Just a timer that turns the current on/off, can be adjusted, prevents warping. I also figured out how to adapt it to a TIG welder - email me if interested. [email protected] But you need to buy the TIG rig. With the 220 volt unit, I can use .035 Dualshield flux core which penetrates better and makes a bit of a stronger weld on heavy stuff than the Innershield. I found 10 lb spools I think it was Esab the only brand that made it in that size spool in .035". (Dual shield also uses a gas shield in addition to the flux core, Innershield does not. Innershield works better outdoors in a breeze.) I just wired up a 200v dryer plug for mine. Yes, you'd need a spool gun for aluminum, should be able to fit one to any of the good units. Check with the dealer. TIG is actually better for aluminum - it's VERY difficult to MIG weld aluminum except absolutely flat position. Good luck!
i agree w/ everything you said.

have a little fun w/ it! it's really quite an artform, and it's a pretty good feeling to build your own worktables, grinder stands, and to not have to pay someone else to do easy welding anymore!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
What's the problem with the Craftsman? I've had good luck with their stuff. Someone fill me in. A blanket statement like "I don't use it cause I don't buy junk." Has anyone reading this thread ever tried the craftsman?

Just asking.

tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
I bought a Clarke 90 EN about 10 yrs. ago because it was on sale really cheap and have used it a lot and have never had a problem with it.It works good for exhaust tubing, thin stock and tack welding projects to be arc welded ,but I find that it on large projects it doesn't have a large duty cycle so I have to work around that.I want to do some sheetmetal and chassis work so I am probably going to upgrade to something like the Millermatic 135 rather than get the gas conversion kit for the Clarke so I agree that if you can afford it get a good one now and you won't regret it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
dont bother with flux core if you just start, you'll make a mess .
well - fluxcore has it's place - for those of us who might have to fix things in the field, say 100 miles away from the closest town, and break off two shock mounts on a hard landing... ;-) but i agree for shop work, ditch it!

On another note, i have a Clarke 180(is clarke a decent make in general?)

http://store.ineedparts.com/store/c...?idproduct=2784

any good? pros cons? (anyone can PM me reply if you want)thanks
honestly, i don't know much about it - i'm not even sure who it's manufactured by. i only have experience with esab, miller, lincoln, hobart, and craftsman.

What's the problem with the Craftsman? I've had good luck with their stuff. Someone fill me in. A blanket statement like "I don't use it cause I don't buy junk." Has anyone reading this thread ever tried the craftsman?

Just asking.

tom
it's not so much that there's a problem w/ the craftsman unit - it's that it's a cheap unit sold for a higher price. drive rollers are cheap, the transformer is tiny, extremely light duty cycle, and i dare say the power is overrated as well - it's just a very cheap unit. if you want cheap unit, buy a century from harbor freight - basically an equivalent unit for much less money.

i'm not making a blanket statement that all craftsman is crap - most of my tools are craftsman. their 1/2 impact wrench that looks like the IR2131 is, in fact, a rebadged ir2131. but not ALL their tools are good - and not ALL their tools have a lifetime warranty either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I corrected the links above, basically I'm going with this unit.
Lincoln Electric Weld Pack 3200 HD.
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Catalog/equipmentdatasheet.asp?p=7112&isolocale=EN

I need the 110 v for versatility, not to mention I have almost no money right now. Looks to be one of the most powerful welders for a 110v setup.

I found one on ebay for $375.00 Hopefully that is a good price, because I haven't found a retail price for it so far.
I think it's basically a retail version of the Lincoln Electric SP-135T with a Video and some extra's thrown in.
Seems to have the same duty cycle, etc. Hopefully it's ok for tubing, hopefully it's compatible with a possible tig upgrade later.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/products/packages/sp135t.asp

Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
I corrected the links above, basically I'm going with this unit.
Lincoln Electric Weld Pack 3200 HD.
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Ca...12&isolocale=EN

I found one on ebay for $375.00 Hopefully that is a good price, because I haven't found a retail price for it so far.
I think it's basically a retail version of the Lincoln Electric SP-135T with a Video and some extra's thrown in.
Seems to have the same duty cycle, etc. Hopefully it's ok for tubing, hopefully it's compatible with a possible tig upgrade later.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/prod...ages/sp135t.asp

Thanks!!
yeah, i think that's the retail version of the sp135-t - should be a good welder for you, as long as you don't plan on welding over 1/4 thick material. Great choice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, Now I just need to find some scrap metal or tubing to weld on(practice), and an adapter for a tank connection, and a C02 tank with some shielding gas.

So .24 wire for exhaust.

Thanks!

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
Use 100% Argon for aluminum welding with a mig..

Use 75% Argon 25% CO2 for mild steel welding..

Use fluxcore wire when welding where a breeze can interfere with your shielding gas.. It smokes alot, but your welds will be clean..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
I priced out what my local welding stores want for the Lincoln 135 migs and I can get a Lincoln Mig-pak 10 for almost half the price on sale this week at Canadian Tire.It is set up for gas use and has a lower rated amps, but anything over 1/4" I use the arc welder for anyway so that isn't a big deal.Anyone have any experience with the Mig-pak 10?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I bought the Mig pack 15 on sale at Crappy tire. I've been really happy with it, it'll do cages and suspension etc. I had a Clarke 110V MIG until it got stolen, and it used to cut out all the time when welding higher amperage jobs. The lincoln may be better, but its real easy to wire up a 220v plug in the shop so i went with the bigger one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I dunno.. I bought the craftsman unit that is a rebranded century 90amp mig unit. I bought it on sale for $250 and then spent another 70 bucks for a 20cf argon tank.. The setup works great, and I can make beautiful welds with it.

For a beginner it is nice, and for light welding it can't be beat. I will eventually buy a bigger unit, but for now I am more than satisfied..

The duty cycle is 20%, which when compared to the lincoln and the hobarts at the same amps had the same duty cycle as their entry level models.

Be careful with harbor freight brand welders, they usually require harbor freight wire.. it is not standard size.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top