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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering putting a Braille lightweight battery in the stock location for simplicity. Is a relocatIon worth the cost and extra weight of cabling and such?
 

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The truth in the answer of this question is more than what’s better or lighter.

The main idea in battery relocation is to transfer more weight to the rear of your Mustang and remove it from the front.

If a light weight battery is utilized in the relocation to the trunk, with 4 gauge cable (maybe just 8 gauge in a drag only car) there will still be less overall weight than the original battery combination. The weight would also be moved rearward off of the front end.

What are your reasons to want to relocate?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't want to relocate as I can install a lightweight battery in the stock location much easier. My current lead acid battery may weigh 30lbs. If I were to switch to a common sealed agm battery and install in trunk; the weight goes up. Is it worth putting a heavier battery in the trunk? I can easily put ballast back there. Also; won't an ARB assist in equal weight distribution in the rear?
I realize why so many do it but....
 

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I looked into this when I was doing my Mustangs. Number 0 gauge / 1 gauge wire/cable/lead is not light. So you will be adding more weight to the vehicle if doing this. Though if you want room in your engine compartment battery relocation might do the trick. If not then its not worth the money, time, or effort.

For ever day driving and only a few times to the track the light weight battery will do much more then the work, money, and time involved to install the battery relocation.

Imo battery relocation to the trunk is not worth it at all. There is so much out there to get power to the ground now a days. The battery relocation kits r becoming a thing of the past - don't see them too much in vehicles now-a-days. If one still wants weight over their tire, milk crate (bolt it down) with 60 + lbs of weight in it will do the same as the battery relocation...with no wiring, relays and or emergency shut off.

Good reliable light weight battery is they way to go if one is looking to remove weight from the front end.
 

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No.
If I didn't have a turbo sitting in that spot I would have put the battery back up front.

ks
 
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Discussion Starter #7
No.
If I didn't have a turbo sitting in that spot I would have put the battery back up front.

ks
My turbo sits where the airbox sat so maybe a battery in the stock location will balance things out side to side.
 

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I run a Go Lithium 16 volt battery in the rear of my car. It weighs 28 lbs less than the Optima battery I had back there. Depending on the type of cable you buy, there are lighter 0/1 gauge cables to be had compared to standard bulk "battery cable". I would never go smaller than 0/1 gauge. When you look at how much current has to flow to provide adequate voltage to sensitive components, the longer the cable, the larger is needs to be.
I don't know how many times I have "fixed" hard start/slow crank heat soak issues on cars by simply running a larger cable from the battery to the starter/starter solenoid and larger cable for the ground side.
When I move a battery to the rear on a Fox, I move the starter solenoid to the area behind the right side strut tower. This shortens dramatically the length of cable needed to go from the battery to the solenoid and from the solenoid to the starter.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I run a Go Lithium 16 volt battery in the rear of my car. It weighs 28 lbs less than the Optima battery I had back there. Depending on the type of cable you buy, there are lighter 0/1 gauge cables to be had compared to standard bulk "battery cable". I would never go smaller than 0/1 gauge. When you look at how much current has to flow to provide adequate voltage to sensitive components, the longer the cable, the larger is needs to be.
I don't know how many times I have "fixed" hard start/slow crank heat soak issues on cars by simply running a larger cable from the battery to the starter/starter solenoid and larger cable for the ground side.
When I move a battery to the rear on a Fox, I move the starter solenoid to the area behind the right side strut tower. This shortens dramatically the length of cable needed to go from the battery to the solenoid and from the solenoid to the starter.
I have a friend who builds classic hot rods and he uses the nice quality, fine stranded 00 cabling that's very workable. It's definitely better than the old welding cable we used years ago.
My son has a road race car with the battery in the trunk. I noticed there's a big solenoid back there as well. It seems to act as a distribution point for power but I haven't really given it a serious look.
 

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I have a friend who builds classic hot rods and he uses the nice quality, fine stranded 00 cabling that's very workable. It's definitely better than the old welding cable we used years ago.
My son has a road race car with the battery in the trunk. I noticed there's a big solenoid back there as well. It seems to act as a distribution point for power but I haven't really given it a serious look.
The solenoid is needed so that when you push the kill switch/lever, it actually kills power to everything, even the alternator so the car will shut down when tripped. It is a high amp solenoid that can handle the load when in use.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The solenoid is needed so that when you push the kill switch/lever, it actually kills power to everything, even the alternator so the car will shut down when tripped. It is a high amp solenoid that can handle the load when in use.
Well that makes sense. There's a tranny cooler and rear diff cooler in the trunk with electric fans and I thought maybe they drew power through the solenoid.
 

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I've looked at many of the lighter batteries with FePo4 in them. The idea is great, but so far there are virtually none that are bolt in, proper sized to fit. Almost all of them are sized randomly and not a match to standard battery sizes. We use a group 65 in most Fords of the 80's to 90's, what I have seen have been too narrow to fit the hold downs.

Those new batteries all do weigh well under 20lbs, which is great, but they are critically sensitive to charging voltage and amperage. Some with detailed specs will tell you that the current limit is 60amps(many smaller sizes are way less), so for those it means a 100+ amp alternator won't work with them.

Most of the not cheap type, will have a BMS, battery management system. Those in theory will protect from everything bad. But read the fine print, most will not protect against a large alternator, but they handle everything else. It's a large changing industry right now.

I didn't find any simple solution to drop one in. You can buy separate battery modules, no BMS, fit them to any space, and add a BMS device to handle alternators etc. From what I saw it(full current AH battery level) would require about 2/3 of the volume of a normal battery. That would work the best right now given the lack of any bolt in choice.

The added work to learn how to put together such a battery, the BMS, get it properly bolted down etc, that's a lot to do for most people. If I had the time now, I might do that for one of my cars to see how it would work out.

One of the last group 65's I bought was about 45lbs, they are heavier than you'd think.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've looked at many of the lighter batteries with FePo4 in them. The idea is great, but so far there are virtually none that are bolt in, proper sized to fit. Almost all of them are sized randomly and not a match to standard battery sizes. We use a group 65 in most Fords of the 80's to 90's, what I have seen have been too narrow to fit the hold downs.

Those new batteries all do weigh well under 20lbs, which is great, but they are critically sensitive to charging voltage and amperage. Some with detailed specs will tell you that the current limit is 60amps(many smaller sizes are way less), so for those it means a 100+ amp alternator won't work with them.

Most of the not cheap type, will have a BMS, battery management system. Those in theory will protect from everything bad. But read the fine print, most will not protect against a large alternator, but they handle everything else. It's a large changing industry right now.

I didn't find any simple solution to drop one in. You can buy separate battery modules, no BMS, fit them to any space, and add a BMS device to handle alternators etc. From what I saw it(full current AH battery level) would require about 2/3 of the volume of a normal battery. That would work the best right now given the lack of any bolt in choice.

The added work to learn how to put together such a battery, the BMS, get it properly bolted down etc, that's a lot to do for most people. If I had the time now, I might do that for one of my cars to see how it would work out.

One of the last group 65's I bought was about 45lbs, they are heavier than you'd think.
That's interesting. Thanks for that info. I have no issue with battery size but I do need it to handle fan amperage at least. I thought I had it all researched out but I better go back and check. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
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Ran a PC680 (14 lbs) for years. Bought my first one in 2009 and it lasted 7 years. The next one lasted 2 hours. The replacement under warranty lasted 3 years. The quality has gotten much worse over the years. I switched to a Braille (17lbs) with a matching aluminum mount and have been very happy with it so far. It has only been in the car for less than a year. I like things simple so I went with the lightweight battery in (near) the stock location. The PC680 is so slim it sat on the frame rail in the stock location once the factory battery box was removed. I fabbed up the mount out of mild steel. The Braille actually mounts to the inner fender in basically the stock location.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ran a PC680 (14 lbs) for years. Bought my first one in 2009 and it lasted 7 years. The next one lasted 2 hours. The replacement under warranty lasted 3 years. The quality has gotten much worse over the years. I switched to a Braille (17lbs) with a matching aluminum mount and have been very happy with it so far. It has only been in the car for less than a year. I like things simple so I went with the lightweight battery in (near) the stock location. The PC680 is so slim it sat on the frame rail in the stock location once the factory battery box was removed. I fabbed up the mount out of mild steel. The Braille actually mounts to the inner fender in basically the stock location.
Thanks for the feedback. Deka makes the Braille and Big Crank batteries and sells for less. What model Braille are you using? Does it work with a high amp alternator? Do you have to keep a charger on it? I'm looking to use it in a daily driven, weekend warrior.
 

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Ran a PC680 (14 lbs) for years. Bought my first one in 2009 and it lasted 7 years. The next one lasted 2 hours. The replacement under warranty lasted 3 years. The quality has gotten much worse over the years. I switched to a Braille (17lbs) with a matching aluminum mount and have been very happy with it so far. It has only been in the car for less than a year. I like things simple so I went with the lightweight battery in (near) the stock location. The PC680 is so slim it sat on the frame rail in the stock location once the factory battery box was removed. I fabbed up the mount out of mild steel. The Braille actually mounts to the inner fender in basically the stock location.
I had one of those too. One self melted, the second also self melted. I'm grateful both times it wasn't in the car. PC680's SUCK.

Relocating the battery just sucks, it opens a huge can of worms for the track, wiring, and weight with all the extra wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I had one of those too. One self melted, the second also self melted. I'm grateful both times it wasn't in the car. PC680's SUCK.

Relocating the battery just sucks, it opens a huge can of worms for the track, wiring, and weight with all the extra wiring.
I'm not going to relocate the battery. I just want to install a lightweight up front.
I've read that some of these smaller batteries don't do well with extreme heat which will be my exact scenario during the summer. Of couse; If I call the manufacturer, they will tell me not to use a motorcycle battery in an automobile.
 

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What about two of the smaller batteries, together in parallel. If none of them fit a normal tray, so a new mounting is part of the process anyway, are there two that can survive together?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What about two of the smaller batteries, together in parallel. If none of them fit a normal tray, so a new mounting is part of the process anyway, are there two that can survive together?
I would do a custom mount. In reading; I see that folks have run the PC280 for years in their DD's. Recent reviews do show a decline in reliability. Who knows what the actual circumstances were in each case.
 
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