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Discussion Starter #1
im buying a shortblock from a guy and was wondering the proper way to store it? if its just covered up with a tarp whats the worst that could happen? im thinking hes just had it setting in his garage.....should i be leary of it? how am i suppsed to store it when i get it? thanks
 

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i have always seen people just cover them in oiled garbage bags. ofcourse standing verticle

a buddy of mine has left a 302 longblock like this for the past 20 years, and he is building it now. you might have to get it magnafluxed or whatever and make sure its good to go.

should be fine though
 

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Discussion Starter #3
oiled garbage bag....sounds good to me.......thanks
 

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Yes, what Mavrick said. Bellhousing end toward the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ohh yeah ,.....whats magnaflux?
 

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magnaflux is a florescent dye that seeps into cracks and shows them under a blacklight.
When I store an engine, I spray everything down with fogging oil, before I cover it up. Works really good if you can spray it down the intake when the engine is running, otherwise shoot it down the spark plug holes and turn the engine by hand.
Fogging oil clings good, I left a block unprotected outside for the last three months to test it out. not even the gasket surfaces on the heads have started to rust, and the lifters look like they'd just been in a recently run engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
what do i do if i find rust? am i screwed??
 

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Depends on where it is. For a block that will go to a machine shop, it's not that big of a deal, it'll get blasted before even checked. I've seen blocks turn out ok after I had to pound the pistons out of them.
 

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grab 2 cans of wd-40 and goto town and wrap it up good in some oil bags as well.
 

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Mars_302 said:
grab 2 cans of wd-40 and goto town and wrap it up good in some oil bags as well.

works great!

This '69 351w block was sitting in my humid basement for 3 years, bagged, soaked in wd40




302 block waiting for freshening in the spring


Coated with wd40/10w30 and bagged
 

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92fiveohh said:
ohh yeah ,.....whats magnaflux?
MagnaFlux® is DRY method of checking for cranks in iron and steel parts. A very large and powerful magnet is placed on the part and DRY iron filings are sprinkled over the part. The iron filings are attracted to any break in the magnetic field (crack).
Originally posted by Ford_fan101
magnaflux is a florescent dye that seeps into cracks and shows them under a blacklight.
What you're describing is MagnaGlo® which is a WET method of checking for cranks in iron and steel parts.

The method for checking for cracks in aluminum parts is a dye penetrant and a reactant.
 

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The shop I used to work in used a CRC-brand spray coating for bare blocks, cranks, and assembled or bare heads and stored them in specialty bags that are very thick. I know Summit Racing sells the bags; $1.95 for head/crank and $2.50 for engine block. Garabage bags are easily torn and don't afford much protection against light nicks on finished surfaces.
 

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Whoops on the magnaflux, the last time I had a set of heads checked they used the dye, and the guy said it was magnaflux, just assumed it was right.
The fogging oil is what we use to winterize engines for customers, it costs about $3.00 a can at the local harware store. It's meant to work as a rust inhibitor, and is also called storage seal.
 

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Yeah, "magnaflux" is a layman's term that EVERYBODY uses to describe crack-checking methods for engine components. Dye penetrant and reactant can be used on iron and steel as well but that's not called MagnaFlux® or MagnaGlo®. Both of those methods use a magnet. The former is a DRY method the latter is a WET method.

If a dye penetrant and reactant is used, we simply called it a "dye check". You thoroughly clean the part (tank, bake, jet), spray the dye penetrant on any area you think there might be a crack, wipe the area clean, and spray the same area with dye reactant. The reactant makes the pentrant show up in any cracks where it wasn't removed from the wipe (ther dye pentrant seaps into the crack).
 
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