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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so, a little background. I had issues with the car starting. Did a bunch of tests on the multimeter (from youtube vids since I don't know much about electrical) and everything checked out.

I had replaced the starter a year earlier and had ruled out that as the issue since it was "new."

That was my mistake. Turned out the "new" starter from Autozone crapped out.

Fast forward to last night and I turned over the car (latest starter has bee installed for about three months) and the car wouldn't stop turning over.

Pulled the negative cable since the S-Wire wasn't stopping it I assumed that it wasn't a sticky ignition or problem with the switch.

The solenoid was new, Motorcraft, and again I assumed it was good because it was new.

I did a continuity test on the solenoid and it had good continuity within spec (about 3.4 ohms) from the S-wire post to the ground.

So I assumed WRONGLY that the solenoid was good. As a last ditch effort before I got under the car and started pulling the starter (because that's a huge PITA) I swapped out the solenoid with the old original solenoid and everything was fine!

So it WAS the new solenoid. But I don't understand why it was bad.

Shouldn't the continuity test have proved it was good? Was there another test I could have done to find if it was bad?

Just trying to understand my fix since it was just a lucky guess.

Thanks for any insight.
 

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Bad grounds craps those solenoids out early. The best fix I've come up with, is to make sure it's grounded better than it came from the factory. If you'll notice, there's no other ground for that solenoid other than the 2 self tapping style bolts and they probably aren't even holding it that tight anyore. I drill one hole out, slightly larger and through bolt it. On that back side I put an eyelet and ground wire under the washer and nut and then I run a ground wire to a known good chassis bolt. Something heavier than the sheet metal. I've done this for a few guys and they never had another solenoid issue.
You may be able to get away with not running the wire but I like to make sure it's grounded way better than it came and I don't want to scuff the paint to get the best metal to metal contact.
 

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a bad ground leads to contacts not closing, ie NO crank

the opposite of what the poster explains they have
 

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Instead of guessing the poster can perform a voltage drop test on the ground, I would expect the ground is fine

negating the need of removing anything
 

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Pay attention to post #2

While I can't guarantee my suggestion is the fix, there's no downside to addressing the poor design. The web is full of ford starter solenoid problems. Everyone who goes through this starts throwing parts at the problem, without fixing the underlying issue that caused the failure. They may even work for a little while, because when you replace the solenoid, you snug up the bolts again. My suggestion takes about 30 min and some scrap wire. If the solenoid has ever stuck, it's going to be more prone to sticking again, unless it's replaced.

Good luck with it Imatk.
 

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WELL

post #2 is dead wrong

what are we supposed to gain from that, how bad understanding of circuit design leads to bad diagnosis?

as that is clear that‘s what is happening over there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I actually have an additional ground from an eyelet on the solenoid. I replaced the solenoid and it works fine.
 

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YOU JUST might want to measure current and voltage as it operates

these things are robust and not usually prone to failure
 
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