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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to fix a leaky lower intake rear seal and took out all 11 bolts when this last one (driver side rear) wouldn’t budge.

Butane torch heat, PB Blaster, nothing helped.

I then tried my weak as snot Harbor Freight impact gun 18v battery unit. I thought the impact was budging it. But since my hand wasn’t on a wrench I didn’t feel it begin to fail.

till finally SNAP!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Half the bolt came out.

Now on to the head- here’s a close uo, it snapped at the threads in the AFR head. Go figure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Time to pull the head now! Part way there. Only remove header and I’ll have this puppy out.
 

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Time to pull the head now! Part way there. Only remove header and I’ll have this puppy out.
For what it is worth, I had the threads break out of an intake bolt hole on an AFR 165 several years ago. I had bought them used, and the failure was after multiple intake removal/install cycles, so I did not even consider blaming the head. I never torqued more than 30 pounds, ans always snugged them in the correct sequence.
I did call AFR just to see if this was a common problem. They said no, and suggested to never use clicker torque wrench on the intake bolts, to either just snug them well or use a beam torque wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I didn’t install this intake unfortunately 12 yrs ago as I had an engine built for me.

But I’ve installed intakes a number of times. I assume anti seize was used but who knows.

I am planning to use ARP materials instead

interesting that they recommend a beam torque wrench instead. I do like those better too. I’ll have to dig mine out. Thanks for the info.

I use long studs in the corners during install and am looking at using ARP studs instead of these crappy OEM bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
~19-20 yrs on these FTI-AFR heads! Still running great! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A tip when it seems like its gonna break

shock the bolt with a punch and hammer, hard wacks
I did do that too. I think I was hosed with the lack of anti seize or maybe just insufficient anti seize.

I am in charge of this install so Lord willing and the creek don’t rise it’ll all be good this time. ARP 354-2103 I think studs are planned so no OEM corroded bolts, ARP lubes.... Fel Pro 1262SE steel shin gasket, silicone around water passages, torqued in stages......
 

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I also have stainless ARP bolts, 12 pt, and always use a touch of antisieze and never us a torque wrench on them after the thread insert fiasco.
Ditto. Tightening intake bolts is tricky because of the parts angles and different gasket/sealing parts. Doing them by hand is best, an experienced hand can judge well how much torque is needed(15-20lbsft on these). A torque wrench gives a false sense of tightness, your hands/wrist etc, don't give you a lot of feedback(you are trusting the TW completely).

Intake bolts must be tight enough to bring the parts and gasket together, making a good seal, plus not ever come loose later.

I do many bolts by hand, like trans pan bolts, VC bolts, and even VB bolts, given many past experiences. Use the smallest ratchet that gives you just enough power to tighten them, and trust your wrist. Amateurs must rely on the TW though, or a more experienced person.
 

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wrenching torque sensitive fasteners in a freezing cold garage or outside in the freezing cold

is never considered....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It’s good to hear others say they like hand feel better than TWs. I never have used them except on heads and intakes. But perhaps I’ll skip on the intake after you alls input. I also liked what I read about ARP studs and nuts on line at their site. How they don’t come loose with their lubes. No need to retorque.

My stang is not out in the cold as my garage holds the heat well. Indy I don’t follow your temperature comment, can you clarify your message for me?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I thought your were suggesting it was better to torque in ambient conditions.

it’s hard to avoid thermal expansion differences with internal combustion engines that heat up and cool back down.

I’ll recheck torque this time after a few heat cycles.
 

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I recently resealed my lower intake and bought the ARP intake stud kit (354-2103). ARP doesn't offer this SBF intake stud kit in stainless, but it sure seems like they would sell if they did. I suppose you could put together something cheaper from McMaster-Carr, but this is one stop shopping with everything the correct size/length.

 

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If you are going to use a torque wrench on an intake, going with a 3/8" drive unit calibrated in inch-pounds is the way to go. You want a torque wrench which will be accurate in the low (sub 20 ft-lbs.) ranges.
 

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I thought your were suggesting it was better to torque in ambient conditions.

it’s hard to avoid thermal expansion differences with internal combustion engines that heat up and cool back down.

I’ll recheck torque this time after a few heat cycles.
I was, more accurately, standard temperature
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Thanks Trunk that’s the.kit I was considering. Since you’ve used it i assume no problems with electrical conductivity with the black oxide coating? Still Ok for one being a ground?

Yes I have the small inch pounds torque wrench, a larger foot pounds version and a beam old school one. I will be using the beam to calibrate my wrists at first.

Thanks Indy that makes your note more clear. Yes I incorrectly used the wrong word. Glad you understood me in spite of the error!
 
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