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Has anyone out there used gapless rings before? My understanding is that they can increase an engines power by sealing the combustion chamber to as low as 1-2% on the leakdown test. They also are reported to keep the engine crankcase cleaner as well. Anyone else use them?

TIA
Dan
 

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Mine never seated and I burned lots of oil.
 

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I'm running the TS1 second ring gapless setup from total seal on my 331 and they seated fine. You must follow the machining and installation instructions included wiht the rings. They directions state to only install the rings with a light oil, like wd-40 and not to dunk the piston in motor oil as in the old days. I believe mine called for a 280 grit hone. I have another friend using them with sucess on his 306.

They now make a top ring gapless setup I'd like to try. They claim as much as 5-6" of increased vacuum vs 3-4" fro the second ring gapless over convention rings.

I tried their "quick seat" powder in the bores this last time. You clean the the bores then wipe in this powder that fills in the hatch marks and gives the bores a greenish tint. I can't say that it helped or not.

good luck,

Mark
 

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Im running the gapless total seals with no problems.
-tyler
 

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I had a 302 with about 24K on it that burned a qt of oil about every 1000 mi. I changed the rings to Total Seal's with nothing else but a cylinder hone, and it cured the oil burning.
But on the downside, I put them in my new 347, and that pig sucks a qt of oil every 200-300 mi.
I have seen a magazine test in the past of TS rings vs. regular rings, and they indeed to give a small power increase, especially when they open the ring gaps up to simulate high milages.
 

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I used them on my circle track motors & have nothing but praise for them. My setup was consistantly stronger off the turns, I credit that to better ring seal.
 

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89LXNB said:
How did that happen?
I think it's because I used a small anount of motor oil on the bores (I just couldn't conceive of rotating the motor dry). The fact that there is a "seating powder" tels you that they are a little fussy on the break-in seating. I'm sure they work fine when carefully following the directions. I have seen other post's WRT these rings and several other people had issues with seating them. I am surprised there is only one other mention here of a motor burning a qt. every 200-300 miles (mine did as well).
 

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Cougar5.O,

I can only speak for my experience & my friends 306 car. The both seated just fine using the procedure laid out in the directions. We both assembled the pistons & bores using only wd-40. We both had the blocks torque plate honed with the 280 grit stones as per the directions. I can't say for sure whether the "quickseat" powder did anything or not. I saw and decided to try. It does show you whether or not the bores are squeaky clean by the color it turns the bores.

I'm sure the most important thing is the quality of the machine work. I did nothing fancy upon startup. I tried to stay restrained with the throttle for the first 100 miles. If the rings don't seat in the first five minutes after start-up, you're SOL in my experience.

I didn't see these rings being tricky to seat or set-up. I just followed the directions. Mine were just ductile iron and moly-coated. Nothing tricky to seat like stainless steel or some more exotic material.

Another thing in the directions is a recommendation to restrict the pcv setup to a .062" orfice due to increased vacuum.

Just my experience,

Mark
 

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In independent dyno testing, the gapless rings did indeed have minimum static leakdown. But, at higher rpms, they had increased blow by, compared to file to fit rings. Result was a 5-10 hp loss at peak.

I can dig up the link if you are seriously interested.

Steve
 

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The second land ring is NOT a compression ring...

It has a tapered face and is an "OIL SCRAPER"...

It is questionable how well this works with an oil rail below it...

The Total Seal ring is not of the "Pre-Lapped" variety and thus must have a coarse grit finish in order to "break-in" the ring.

From a performance standpoint, this type of cylinder finish went out with the dark ages...

It is generally considered by most race engine builders that Speed-Pro makes the finest compression rings, while the Hastings Oil Ring is superior...

You can buy it together in one box from JE...
 
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