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Is there such thing as a spray on hardner??? Can you put on the resin and then spray on a form of hardner with a sprayer???

I was thinking about designing a custom fiberglass speaker encloser.. I've been wanting to learn how to work with fiberglass for a long time... my idea was to make an armature and then soak some fabric in resin, wring out the excess, then stretch it over the form then apply the hardner. I want the outside layer to be smooth so I don't have to sand and use filler to get a good finish... then I would layer it up from the inside..

Or would it be better the dip the fabric in resin with hardner in it then quickly stretch it over and secure it... or would it be best to do it the old fashion way of stretching the material and brush it will resin/hardner all at one time..

Remember I am a Newbie at this. I love working with my hands and can weld, and metal cast aluminum and bronze so this isn't a project that's over my head.

Also where to get fiberglass.. both woven and chopped?? Boat supply warehouse?? Where else? I know I can get it in small quantities at Walmart and Home Depot.
 

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Well, the hardner is usually just mixed into the resin batch before you start using it, so you'd really just be adding another step. That said, I don't know of any spray on hardeners out there.

Also, you want to have the glass cloth attatched/stretched onto your frame or mold before you apply the resin, or else it's just going to sag and deform itself with the additional weight. And you can forget about getting a finish good enough to skip the sanding. Unless you're going to use a thick carpet to cover the piece, you'll be doing at least some sanding, period. Building the layers on the inside is a good idea though, and will cut down the time you spend sanding if you get a good outer skin on there.

Good luck!
 

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Joker is right...you always have to sand. I would practice on something first before you go and dive into your project. I would go for the brush because it's just easier. There is no spray on hardeners out there. Some tips...don't be stingey with the brushes. Get a how ton of the them and change often. Wear some rubber gloves, and change those often. Keep your work area as neat as possible. Oh and what ever you do, don't ever be stingey with the hardener. Because the worst damn thing in the world is when you don't put enough hardener in and you are left with a drippy mess. Good Luck
 

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anybody done any custom kicks on a mustang. I just bought some Vifa mids and i wanna glass some custom kicks for them and probably vifa tweeters. You think there is enough room have sealed kicks down there? If not I'll try a 3 way with an open kick. also any additional info is appreciated.
 

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illfos said:
Some tips...don't be stingey with the brushes. Get a how ton of the them and change often. Wear some rubber gloves, and change those often.
If you have a harbor freight near you, you can pick up a box of 50 2" brushes for about 10-12 bucks I think, and a box of 100 latex gloves for about the same price....you'll soon be thankful after you get into a bigger project

Keep your work area as neat as possible. Oh and what ever you do, don't ever be stingey with the hardener. Because the worst damn thing in the world is when you don't put enough hardener in and you are left with a drippy mess. Good Luck
You also don't want to use too much hardener either, though. Once the stuff starts to gel in the bowl before you can use it all, you'll see what I mean. If it cures too fast after it's been applied, it can sometimes shrink and warp the cloth, resulting in a misshapen piece. But yeah, you definitely want to use enough, so you can actually get more than one layer done in a reasonable amount of time.
 

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you can use fleece (t-shirt material) to make the shape you want, and then apply hardener to that, then build it up with fiberglass, works better than trying to stretch wet fiberglass mat.

Ryan.
 

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"this is one hell of a good thread!"

Now, can somebody explain in detail what supplies are needed/ thanx
 

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Here's what I use:

1. Fiberglass Resin/Hardener...a container of resin usually has a tube of hardener with it, but you can get it separate too.
2. Fiberglass Cloth or Mat...the cloth will give a better finish surface, making sanding a little easier, but the mat builds up a bit quicker.
3. Fleece (tshirt material)...Very useful for building up layers quickly, as it's thick and soaks up a ton of resin.
4. Lots of cheap brushes...the cheaper the better, as they are no good once the resin sets in the fibers of the brush. And none of those black foam brushes, either.
5. Mixing bowl...you can get a decent sized mixing bowl at Home Depot in the paint department for a buck or so, and it'll last you a long time, so long as you don't waste resin by overmixing a batch and letting it harden in the bowl.
6. Latex gloves...I usually just pick up a box of 100. You'll want these because the resin can burn you if it cures on your skin. Not fun.
7. Tape...lots of masking tape to put down in the area you're molding, so the glass piece can be removed later.
8. Cooking spray...use as a mold release by spraying a bit (not too much) on the tape before you lay the glass. It makes it much easier to remove the piece when you're ready. Otherwise it'll stick to the tape. You can also buy actual Mold Release, but cooking spray works just as well.

You might want a respirator too, as the fumes can be a bit unsettling (and truthfully, they're really not the best thing for you), but I haven't used one. I typically work outside where there's plenty of ventilation. Still, I might pick one up sometime.

That's the stuff I use, hopefully some others will chime in if they do things differently.
 

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JOKERWYLDE, that's for that reply-very very educational.

Can anyone recommend a store to purchase the supplies???

Menards? h depot (I cant stand that store-the employes dont know jack)?
 

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You can get most of the supplies from walmart or pepboys/autozone. The only items that
will not be at either of those will be the cheap brushes in large numbers, for that you
should be able to find them at a harbor freight store.
 

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