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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

I was bored so I asked John Janek to assist me in answering some Frequently Asked Questions on the Pro-M Engine Management System (EMS). We had a good time putting this together and we hope it helps.


Q. Why is the Pro-M EMS so expensive?
A. Good things aren’t cheap. The quality of manufacturing and components that go into the Pro-M EMS cost money.

The processor is manufactured by the Visteon Corporation. Visteon is a Fortune 500 company spun from the Ford Motor Company in 2000. Visteon designs and manufactures many of the factory electronic parts in your Mustang.

The software developers who code the Pro-M EMS strategies are actual Ford Engineers who are constantly updating the software to make the system better (more on this later). They get paid very well.

The Ford connectors, wiring, terminals, wire loom, and harness wrap are top-notch quality pieces and are specifically designed for automotive engine bays. The system doesn’t utilize cheap, generalized wire that can be purchased at Home Depot or hobby kit connectors from a place like your local electronic store. Lay a competitor's wiring harness next to a Pro-M wiring harness and the differences are immediately clear. Their harnesses contain a bare minimum of circuits. You get only what is needed to run the engine. One competitor claims to have a “Fox Body Mustang Specific” harness. That claim could not be more untrue. The Pro-M harness literally has three times the wiring theirs does, contains all the original circuits used in the original harnesses and uses all the original connectors. The competition claims that their “Fox Body Specific” harness fits all model years. Pro-M makes TEN DIFFERENT HARNESSES FOR THE FOX BODY alone. Not to mention the six other harnesses they make for the other Mustangs from 96 through 2004. Why? Because the original harnesses differ from year to year and that is what is necessary to make a true vehicle specific harness.

Add-on features like traction control, launch assist, progressive Nitrous and Water/Methanol Control are included in the price at no additional cost. Want to add traction control to the other guy's system? Be prepared to spend $600 to $1000 for an add on box that works as well as the Pro-M does. It’s not an apple to apple comparison when people try to compare low dollar EMS’s against a Pro-M EMS because of the quality and features built into every Pro-M system. Compare the initial cost of the Pro-M EMS to any other EMS with comparable features (Holley Dominator) out there and you'll see the cost is about the same.


Q. What makes the Pro-M processor unique?
A. Self-protecting, self-diagnosing and production quality processor

Self-protecting processor: If the Pro-M EMS processor detects a short circuit, it will shut down the affected ECM driver. Of course, it will also turn on the check engine light and store a code to direct you to the problem.

Self-diagnosing processor: The Pro-M EMS processor continuously checks itself for faults. No more guessing whether or not the processor is the source of trouble. These processors are extremely robust and have already been through the most rigorous testing in the industry long before going on the shelf, so the chance of ever having trouble with one is slim to none. But when doing diagnostics, wouldn't it be nice to know whether or not the processor could be at fault? No testing needed. If there is trouble, it will let you know.

Production quality processor: As noted above, the Pro-M EMS processor is made by Visteon, the same manufacturer who makes the processors for Ford (how nice). This is something you simply will NOT find anywhere else. The competition uses low production modules that cannot compare to the quality of the Pro-M EMS processor and do not go through the rigorous testing that the Pro-M EMS processors do. The Pro-M EMS processors must meet the same quality standards as the Ford factory processors. They are built in the same plant, side by side with the Ford factory processors. Furthermore, the strategies loaded into the processors are written by Ford contractors. Quite honestly, everyone involved in this project is absolutely the finest in their field.


Q. Just how quickly does the Pro-M EMS react to sensor input and control my engine?
A. Let’s use an example. If MAF voltage were sampled at an anemically slow 1MHz (in reality, the system samples faster than this), that would be 1 million samples per second. For an engine that idles at 1000rpm, the engine revolves approximately 16 times per second. Given that there are 4 cylinder events per revolution, that means there are 64 cylinder events per second and 1/64 of a second between cylinder events. In the time between cylinder events, the processor will have analyzed 15,625 data points and will use them to decide what to do for the next event. That’s a lot of data. Let’s take it to 6000rpm. It’s still 2,604 data points between cylinder events.


Q. What strategy does the Pro-M EMS use?
A. There has been some misinformation posted online that the Pro-M strategy is likely the same one that was used by Ford in 1986. That is wrong. In 2013, the first Pro-M EMS version released was 3.60, and that wasn’t even close to what was used in 1986. Currently today, Pro-M is at version 7.23 and it might even be higher than that by the time we finish writing this. All numbers to the left of the decimal signify major changes to the strategy and all numbers to the right of the decimal point denote minor changes to the strategy. To think that a strategy for fuel, spark or nitrous oxide from 1986 is the same or close to the same strategy as that employed by Pro-M today is ridiculous. (There would be no need to be paying Ford engineers to write code for the Pro-M EMS now if that were true.) To help illustrate the point, the Pro-M EMS uses adaptive strategies for idle and fuel, and those concepts never even existed back in 1986, never mind Progressive Water/Methanol Injection, Progressive Nitrous Control, Traction Control, and Launch Assist, etc. The best comparison we can give is the iPhone. Let’s compare the first-generation iPhone to the current iPhone 11. Both iPhones can make phone calls and surf the internet, but the latest generation does it better and faster with more capabilities than the first-generation iPhone. As far as providing any technical specifications documenting exactly how the Pro-M EMS is coded, that’s PROPRIETARY information.


Q. How come no one else builds a Mass Air based EMS?
A. For the same reason, no one else uses production quality processors and no one else makes high-quality direct fit wire harnesses with all the correct connectors…..it’s MONEY. It costs more money to produce a Mass Air based EMS and less money to produce a Speed Density system.


Q. What are the four things you must-have for an engine to run?
A. Air, Fuel, Compression, and Spark.

1) Air – Airflow at any given time is a function of the combination of the engine parts and how much air is permitted to enter the engine via the throttle blade.

2) Fuel – The proper amount of fuel is added to that air via the fuel injectors.

3) Compression – The air-fuel mixture must be compressed in order to create the powerful expansion necessary to make power once the compressed air/fuel mixture is ignited.

4) Spark – Spark must occur to ignite the air/fuel mixture and it must happen at the proper time. The time at which this occurs is known as spark advance.

Only two of these things are engine management related. Those things are “Fuel” and “Spark.” The other two (Air and Compression) are strictly mechanical and are not controlled by the engine management system. The exception to that rule is electronic throttle control, but that topic is not relevant here.

In a net shell, basic engine management is a matter of providing the proper amount of fuel and providing a spark at the proper time. In order to determine the proper amount of fuel to inject and when to ignite it, you need to know the airflow. The BEST way to determine airflow is to monitor it directly with a Mass Airflow Sensor. Once you understand that, it becomes clear why the Pro-M EMS is unique.


Q. What is Mass Air Engine Management?
A. It's important to understand that the mass of the air being ingested by the engine is the single most important value necessary to determine how much fuel to supply to the engine and to determine what the spark advance should be. A Mass Air engine management system uses a Mass Air Meter to directly measure the mass of the air being ingested by the engine at any given time. You should also understand that the combination of engine parts is irrelevant when using Mass Air engine management. That combination will result in some amount of air mass. Since that air mass is directly measured, the combination of engine parts that resulted in that air mass simply does not matter. And for this reason, you can change that combination of engine parts as often as you'd like. You can even add a supercharger or a turbocharger and this rule still applies. I made an additional 90 rwhp at the wheels by simply removing an air filter off the inlet of my supercharger with NO TUNING, and the car was safe.

The air mass value is used to calculate a value for “Load”. Load is defined as “Ingested Air Mass divided by Potential Air Mass.” It sounds complicated but it isn't. The ingested air mass is simply the reading taken by the mass air meter. The potential air mass is a calculation done by the PCM that uses the engine's cubic inch displacement and RPM. When you have “Load”, you have everything you need to know. Load will determine what your air/fuel ratio should be. It will also determine what your spark advance should be.


Q. What is Speed Density and how it is used in OEM applications?
A. Speed Density systems use a method where the manifold vacuum and engine RPM are used to calculate the volume of air being ingested by the engine when using a fixed combination of parts. That estimated volume of air is then corrected for temperature and pressure. There is much more to it than this, but for the purpose of this writeup, this explanation will suffice. There are several articles on the web that explain this in greater detail if you care to gain a deeper understanding of speed density.

So why do so many auto manufacturers use Speed Density? In the auto industry where cost is a major factor, there are obvious cost benefits to not having to install a Mass Air Meter in every vehicle. For that reason, and that reason alone, some OEMs will use Speed Density engine management. In an OEM application, speed density makes a lot of sense. Think about how much money they can save by not having to buy millions of mass air meters!

The method the OEM manufacturers use to do this is very time consuming and very expensive, but worth it since they can amortize this time over hundreds of thousands of vehicles that are all using the same engine.

That last sentence is very important. They will have an entire team of calibrators spend about six months mapping out a specific combination of engine parts in a controlled environment on an engine dyno. They will hold that engine at every possible combination of RPM, throttle position, temperature, and atmospheric pressure and use a Mass Air meter to record the air mass at each operating point. This data is used to calculate the Load values for the calibration or tune that will be used for that engine. It is important to understand that the Speed Density systems used in the OEM still use load for their fueling and spark advance calculations. They call this Speed Density, but a Mass Air meter was used to generate the data needed.

This method works quite well for cars running out of the showroom with identical combinations. But let’s look at why we were/are in the market for an EMS in the first place. We have modified things in the effort to gain performance, and now we need something to control this very different combination. Every engine is different. Plummer’s isn’t even remotely close to John’s. Different displacement, different heads, different intakes, different cam profiles, different number of cams, different compression… we could go on endlessly. You can't justify the time, even if you had access to the necessary equipment, to set up a proper speed density tune for each of these different combos. For this reason, this version of speed density is not applicable to the aftermarket but is important to understand how this is done.


Q. So how is Speed Density used in the Aftermarket?
A. Today, Speed Density systems are almost always “Self-Learning” systems.

The process... Tell the ECU what air/fuel ratio you want under the varying operating conditions. The “Self-Learning” systems will use feedback from a wideband oxygen sensor to achieve those values. Here is the problem… Where do you come up with those values? The answer? You guess until it runs.

While much better than the old methods, due to the significant savings in the amount of time spent tuning these, the simple truth is that it is just a faster method to get to the same old incorrect result.

The problem… You simply do not have the information you need to create a proper tune, because you have no method to measure air mass, and therefore no way to calculate “Load”.

Idle is simple. An air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1 will work. Experiment from there. Wide-open throttle is a bit more involved but still simple. You experiment with values on the dyno until it makes max power. Not complicated but time-consuming and expensive. The rest, which is everything in between, is just a bunch of guesswork until you get it to run reasonably well. Understand that there are too many possible scenarios to ever get this anywhere near as good as it would be using a mass air engine management system. Outside of drag racing, the fact is the area between idle and wide-open throttle is where you spend 99.9% of your time driving your vehicle, and it's also where speed density in the aftermarket gives you the worst results.

Don't confuse “Self-Learning” with “Self-Tuning”, which is what many aftermarket manufacturers call it. There is no such thing as self-tuning. The tuner still must dictate to the ECU what the air/fuel ratios will be, and without a value for load, it’s all just guesswork.

How about spark advance? Speed Density offers you nothing to use to come up with proper spark advance values. Understand that spark advance is half the battle, and all you can do is take a guess.

You should also know that speed density systems work poorly with aggressive camshafts. Speed density systems rely heavily on the reading from the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor. Aggressive cams produce a little vacuum and therefore little for the MAP sensor to work with.

Additionally, Speed Density systems need to be re-tuned every time you make a change to the engine. Even a small change. That’s great for the tuning shop. Not so great for you. Remember Plummer’s car picking up 90 HP to the wheels when he removed his filter and did nothing else? Try that with Speed Density. (No, don’t try it. It’s not safe.)

There are two reasons why an aftermarket EFI manufacturer wants to sell you a Speed Density system. Neither of them benefits the customer. First, they are less expensive to manufacture. Second, they put the burden of getting your engine to run properly on the end-user.


Q. Can you run the Pro-M EMS as a Speed Density system?
A. Have you been reading? The answer is actually… Yes, but it doesn’t make sense to do so in all but the rarest cases. The Pro-M EMS is designed as a MAF based EMS because MAF is easier to tune and use. Speed Density can be enabled with the addition of the optional MAP sensor for those that are intent on making things difficult.


Q. Why would someone want to buy the Pro-M EMS?
A. There are people who want a processor that was developed with a budget far exceeding the budget of every one of these other systems combined, with software and strategies developed by the same people who developed the strategies for the vehicles that have to meet all the federal safety regulations and minimize warranty claims, and with hardware that has a real measured mean time between failure under every possible operating condition.

In addition, they want these systems to run their car without having to spend lots of time tuning. Simply remove the factory processor and harness, and plug the new harness in. No wiring. No real knowledge required. The dashboard works, the fans work, A/C control works, everything. And without making the argument again, MAF is easier to tune, period. In most cases, the default base fuel and spark maps (and all the modifier tables to them) that come with this system will work right out of the box.

In all fairness, each style system (MAF and Speed Density) will make the same power and have the same drivability when tuned properly. The Pro-M EMS tune is already at the OEM level right out of the box for Mass Airflow engine management. Airflow is directly measured, and everything stems from that. The chances of tuning Speed Density properly at an OEM level are slim. We believe MAF will adapt better than Speed Density or Alpha/N, but they all work. It just depends on what your objective is and how much time you want to spend. As was mentioned earlier, if you’re dead set of making things difficult, you can run the Pro-M EMS as Speed Density.


Q. Why does the Pro-M Engine Management System use two (2) widebands instead of one?
A. In a perfect world, there would be no reason to, but things aren’t perfect. The reality is most intake manifolds don’t distribute airflow exactly evenly between banks. As a result, one bank may run slightly richer than the other. This can be witnessed by looking at the readout of each bank’s wideband with the system’s fuel control set in open loop. They likely won’t be the same. For example, bank 1 might be running 14.0 while bank 2 is running 15.5. Utilizing two widebands allows the system to correct the a/f in each bank independently. Again, this can be witnessed by looking at the readout for each bank, but this time with the system in closed loop. Corrected independently, both banks should now be at 14.7. This would be impossible with only one wideband. In fact, using the above example, closed loop with only one wideband will make the situation in one of the two banks even worse. If the sensor were placed in bank 1, the system would assume that the entire engine is running rich at 14.0. It will pull fuel from BOTH banks until bank 1 gets to 14.7. But, therefore, bank 2 went from an already lean 15.5 to somewhere around 16.0-16.2. If a lone wideband were to be placed in bank 2 instead, the same problem exists, just in the opposite direction. As you can see, one wideband is poor. It costs more to run two widebands, and you get what you pay for.


Q. Is the Pro-M EMS truly a “Plug & Play” Engine Management System?
A. Honest answer… neither of us likes this term. Do you literally plug it in and drive away? No. You absolutely MUST set up your calibration properly with GOOD injector data, GOOD MAF data, and proper bore, stroke, and the number of cylinders. If you’re not comfortable with that, Chris Richards will do it for you for a small fee. Your engine MUST be in proper operating condition. And you MUST properly follow the directions with setting up base idle. If you don’t follow these directions, plug in the system, and just expect the car to drive away perfectly, then you will be disappointed. However, if you are methodical and follow the instructions, then it’s about as “plug & play” as possible.


Q. Can the same Pro-M Engine Management System for my 96 Mustang GT be used on other model-year Mustangs?
A: Yes and No. The processor itself is the same. That is 100% transferrable. In fact, Plummer’s processor that he uses in his 94 Mustang was once put into another of our friend’s 98 Cobra to prove that a problem he had was NOT the processor. (His cams were degreed wrong.) It took us all of 2 minutes to make the swap. Flash the proper calibration file into the processor and plug it into the harness in the car. The harnesses themselves are different as they contain wiring and connectors specific to the engine/sensors/ignition system in the car. If you have a complete system for a 96 and want to put it into a 94-pushrod car, you’ll need the 94-95 harness. The calibration files themselves have different settings selected, but technically it is all the same software. When initially purchased, Chris puts all the proper settings in the calibration for you based on the year vehicle you have. Swapping to another year is just a matter of changing the appropriate settings.

Thanks
Michael Plummer and John Janek
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Q. Is the Pro-M PCM, the same PCM that Ford used in their production cars from 2005 to 2014?
A. Yes and no… Physically, yes it is. The PCMs are made side by side with the production Ford units. They started out as V10 truck modules and there have been some internal changes to suit Pro-M needs. However, the code is all Pro-M's own. Written by a team of Ford Engineer contractors. The result is OEM quality, OEM level calibrations, and aftermarket flexibility.


Q. Does Pro-M make an EMS for a GM vehicle? If not, why?
A. Pro-M does. Since the strategies Pro-M use are universal to any engine, they can run virtually any engine. Pro-M does offer complete EFI conversions and engine management systems for most domestic V8 engines. Including all of the GM products. Not just Chevys.

More to come.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Q. I asked Chris Richards how come Pro-M Racing has a reputation for providing excellent customer service, and why it's important to him.
A. "In my opinion, customer service is more than just doing the obvious. The obvious being answering the phone, returning messages, and giving prompt responses to email messages. Anyone can do that, although most don’t. We do our best here, but people need to understand that in order to get help that is worth giving, you need to talk to someone who actually knows what they are doing. We don’t hire just anyone in the name of getting the phone answered. That doesn’t help if the information you’re getting is crap. Good information is worth waiting for. We do our best to provide it promptly.

Giving good advise, providing real know-how that helps people do things the right way, and helping them when things go wrong. Those are the things that matter. And if we can teach them something in the process, then even better. Even more important than that is selling products that actually do what they are supposed to do. That is real customer service. That is extremely rare these days. Everyone makes claims. Most of then are untrue. And unfortunately, too many people fall for them."




...................................................The next five (5) questions are...........................................................................................
FEATURES NOT YET AVAILABLE, BUT COMING SOON
And Pro-M will have a means for past customers to add it to their cars too, so they will not be left out.

Q. What is “No Lift Shift” and how does it work with the Pro-M system?
A. "No Lift Shift" is the ability to shift through the gears with a manual transmission without lifting off of the accelerator pedal. The Pro-M EFI PCM will know when your foot is to the floor (WOT) and when the clutch pedal is depressed. If you’ve enabled the No Lift Shift feature, the PCM will activate a rev limiter that will set the engine to the proper RPM for the next gear. The benefits here are obvious even when naturally aspirated, but with boost you can also do away with the drop in Boost pressure associated with lifting the throttle. You’ll improve your track times and minimize abuse on your drivetrain.


Q. Why is Boost Control important on a Turbo application?
A. Boost control adds a few benefits. The first and most obvious one is the ability to dictate your boost level without having to change the wastegate spring. In fact, the lower the spring pressure the better, since it allows a greater range of pressure adjustment using the boost control.

You also have the ability to control how much boost you have at any given time based on several options. The benefit here being the ability to ramp up the boost to keep the tires stuck to the pavement and to minimize abuse to the drivetrain, while improving acceleration. The Pro-M system will have the ability to control boost based on:

1) Throttle position and RPM

2) Throttle position and RPM for each individual gear. This will work with both automatic and manual transmissions.

3) Time since launch - Activated by the 2 step rev limiter.

4) Time in each gear. This works with both automatic and manual transmissions as well.

5) Any combination of the above......Got Damn.

* There will also be a boost adder based on ethanol content and a boost adder based on the amount of water methanol being delivered.

* All of these features will be wrapped up in closed loop control.

* There will also be some safety measures. A rev limiter for over-boost in case of component failure, and a boost limiter if the capability of your fuel supply system is exceeded for example.

* All of this wrapped up in OBD-II diagnostics if things go wrong.


Q. How easy is it to setup and use?
A. Like everything Pro-M does they've taken the hard work out of this for you. Pro-M Racing encourages you to have a look at what's involved in getting boost control to work effectively with the other Engine Management Systems. Only then can you appreciate what they’ve done here. The other guys require weeks (perhaps months) of experimentation to get their boost controls working in open loop. Then, once you have that done, it’s more experimenting with closed loop controls to get that working. With the Pro-M boost controls, they've done all of that for you. It’s just another example of how easy things can be when they are done the right way. You simply tell the Pro-M EFI PCM how much boost you want and when you want it.


Q. Does Pro-M EMS have Boost Control for a supercharged applications?
A. Of course they do. Pro-M plans to release this along with boost control for turbocharged applications, so stay tuned.


Q. Why is it a good idea for a supercharged application?
A. For the same reasons as in a turbocharged application. You can dictate how much boost you want and when you want it. In a supercharged application, you can even run a bigger blower, or a smaller pulley, and bring on the boost on faster than normal, but not run more total boost if you don’t want to. Or dictate how much boost you want based on the fuel you’re using or how much water/methanol you’re spraying. The possibilities are endless here.
 
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Q. When Pro-M adds new features to their Engine Management System, is there always an option for pre-existing customers with an older harness to get these features too? If so, why?
A. Yes, the option is always there. Pro-M's philosophy is that it's not OK to leave people who bought systems in the past out in the cold. For that reason, Pro-M always comes up with a way for them to upgrade to the latest strategies and features.

Q. How does Pro-M Racing test new features before releasing them? Does Pro-M Racing have actual test bed vehicles?
A. Pro-M has several test vehicles. These include a turbocharged 99 GT with an automatic that was used to develop automatic trans and returnless fuel controls, a Jeep with a GM LS swap for testing some unique LS controls, an older n/a Fox with a 347, and a 91 LX that has almost everything Pro-M offers running in it simultaneously. Once Pro-M thoroughly tests new features in their test vehicles, they then look for a small group of volunteers to try them out. (This usually includes Michael and/or me in addition to others.) After receiving feedback from this group and possibly making some adjustments based on that feedback, Pro-M releases the updates to the public.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
THIS THREAD IS FOR JOHN JANEK & MICHAEL PLUMMER TO POST FAQ AND CLEAR-UP MIS-INFORMATION ON THE PRO-M ENGINE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.

PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

THANK YOU
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Q. Why doesn’t the Pro-M EMS work well with aftermarket distributors?
A. It does work with aftermarket distributors, as long as that distributor works. I guess the real question is…Why don’t aftermarket distributors work? I tried both the MSD 8455 and Performance Hot forged distributors and my car wouldn't idle or drive correctly with either distributor.

So why the issue? Because these aftermarket companies use the cheapest components they can buy to build them. In some cases, they don't even work out of the box and the ones that do work will likely fail in the near future. The problem is very poor quality electronics, and shutter wheels that are manufactured way out of tolerance. Replace the stator with a quality piece from Ford Motorcraft and use your original shutter wheel from your stock OEM distributor or purchase a new shutter wheel from Pro-M. With those upgrades you can use any distributor you want and you should have no problems.


Q. When using the Pro-M EMS, what other sensors would be considered important besides the Mass Air Flow meter and wideband O2?
A. Wait for it..............All of them. They all play an important role. I haven't seen many problems with most aftermarket sensors like IAT, ECT, TPS with the exception of the hall sensor/stator in the distributor. I still recommend, Ford Motorcraft parts for sensors because I feel the quality is better and they can still be found on eBay.


Q. Can someone with a little to no knowledge install the Pro-M EMS in their Mustang in a day? What areas would be the hardest, if I was working by myself?
A. This is the question, I asked myself when I was deciding on purchasing the system. Basically it depends on the skill set of the installer. None of it is difficult. Just follow the instructions. If you’re not mechanically inclined, then figure on two 8-hour days from start to finish. If you are a skilled mechanic, a full day should do it.

I found passing the harness thru the firewall the hardest. If you have a partner helping then it's not that difficult but by yourself it does take time and some patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Q. What kind of a laptop do I need to run the Pro-M EMS?
A. The Pro-M EMS will work with Microsoft Windows 7 or newer and MAC OS. My recommendation is to get a laptop that runs Windows 10.
Minimum system requirements:
  • 2 GHz CPU
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Microsoft Windows® 7 or newer
  • Microsoft .NET Framework 4.6.1 or higher
  • USB Port
Q. How much HP will the Pro-M EMS support?
A. There is no limit to the amount of horsepower the Pro-M EMS system can support. You're limited by your choice of components. Your engine's flow capabilities is your biggest limiting factor. Next are supporting components, like fuel injectors. Bottom line, if the components exist to make the power you want, then the Pro-M EMS can run them.
 

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EVERYONE PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Q. Does the Pro-M offer a knock retard function?
A. At this time no they don't but you do have a very fast ECM and once combined with a knock sensor it will make it possible for the ECM to either maintain, adjust or alter its operation based on the amount of knock received to prevent damage to the engine and achieve maximum performance.
 

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Q. How does the Pro M Traction Control Work?

A. Simplifying a little... What happens is the system derives the rate of acceleration of the rear wheels by means of the OSS and entered parameters for gear ratios and tire circumference. The traction control section within the software has a parameter for maximum vehicle rate of acceleration. Out of the box, this is set to 22 mph/sec. (That number is about the maximum a typical tire can hold. Of course there are exceptions, and that's why you can adjust it.) If the derived rate of acceleration exceeds 22 mph/sec, then the assumption is that the tires have lost their grip and are spinning. The ECU will retard spark advance to reduce power and help the tires regain traction.

Exactly how much timing gets pulled is determined from a combination of how much the rate of acceleration is exceeding 22 mph/sec and how fast the vehicle is traveling when the tires break free. There are therefore two tables: One lists an amount of spark to pull based off the tire acceleration rate. (For example, pull 20 degrees at 22 mph/sec, pull 24 degrees at 25 mph/sec, pull 26 degrees at 30 mph/sec, and so on. The idea here is the more your tires are spinning out of control, the more power we need to cut by retarding timing more.) The other table is a multiplier to the first table for vehicle speed. When spin occurs at lower speeds, the multiplier is 1 and you get all the retardation the first table commands. At higher vehicle speeds, you don't need as much power cut to regain traction, so the multiplier gets smaller.

Let's make an example (and I'm making up numbers here). You're traveling 15 mph in 1st gear and floor it. The system detects that the rear tires are accelerating at a rate of 26 mph/sec. This will be assumed as tire spin and TC will immediately kick in. First it looks to see how much timing to pull for the rate. According to the first table, you have it set up that 26 mph/sec requires 25 degrees of timing to be pulled. Next up is the multiplier. The multiplier table has vehicle speed of 15 mph with a multiplier of 1, so we multiply 25 degrees times 1 and we get the full 25 degrees pulled. Whatever the spark advance was at the time the TC kicked in, the system will take 25 away from that. Power is therefore reduced and the tires' rate of acceleration decreases. Assuming the rate of acceleration of the wheels drops back below 22 mph/sec, the system will then start ramping the spark advance back in. This ramp rate is set to 30 degrees/sec out of the box but is also adjustable. The advance gets ramped back in until you are back to full commanded timing OR until the wheels' rate of acceleration exceeds 22 mph/sec again... in which case the above listed process repeats.

Now let's say you're going 70 mph in 3rd and floor it. You've got enough power to break the tires free. The wheels' rate of acceleration hits 23 mph/sec. The first table says that it needs to pull 22 degrees. The second table says at 70 mph we have a multiplier of .3. 23 times .3 is 6.9 degrees, so only 6.9 degrees gets removed this time to bring the tires back under control.

You do need to play with the numbers a little to find what values work best for you to stop spin but not totally bog the engine. If you retard timing a little too much it can feel like you just totally shut down. If you stay in the throttle, what you'll see is that after the bog, the timing gets ramped back in and the car will start taking off again. Lower the numbers just a little at a time and keep trying it. Don't let out of the throttle. You need to feel it come back in.
 

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EVERYONE, PLEASE DO NOT POST QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS IN THIS THREAD. ALL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE POSTED IN THE PRO-M SECTION BELOW.

Can't thank John Janek enough for explaing something to me the other day and today as I was in the garage with the car. A great explanation on MAP (PSI), MAP (in Hg), Boost Only, and Auto Meter Boost gauge.

Column A shows a MAP reading in PSI. The lowest value of 0 psi would be zero absolute pressure, which is a perfect vacuum.

Column B shows a MAP reading in Hg. This is not the same as in Hg on a boost gauge as the zero points are different. Again, 0 here is zero absolute pressure.

Column C shows what a boost gauge would show using only PSI for units. Note that at absolute zero pressure, the boost gauge would read -14.7 psi. Also note that when MAP psi is 14.7 is when the boost gauge reads 0.

Column D is what a typical Auto Meter boost gauge would look like. It uses in Hg as the units for vacuum (pressure below atmospheric) and psi for pressure above atmospheric. In Hg values here are flipped compared to Column B's MAP in Hg because we are moving in opposite directions, or you could say from different 0 points.

1069922


MAP PSIMAP in HgBoost Gauge PSIGBoost Gauge in Hg and PSI
0​
0​
-14.7​
-29.9​
1​
2.0​
-13.7​
-27.9​
2​
4.1​
-12.7​
-25.8​
3​
6.1​
-11.7​
-23.8​
4​
8.1​
-10.7​
-21.8​
5​
10.2​
-9.7​
-19.7​
6​
12.2​
-8.7​
-17.7​
7​
14.3​
-7.7​
-15.7​
8​
16.3​
-6.7​
-13.6​
9​
18.3​
-5.7​
-11.6​
10​
20.4​
-4.7​
-9.6​
11​
22.4​
-3.7​
-7.5​
12​
24.4​
-2.7​
-5.5​
13​
26.5​
-1.7​
-3.5​
14​
28.5​
-0.7​
-1.4​
14.696​
29.921​
0​
0​
15​
30.5​
0.3​
0.3​
16​
32.6​
1.3​
1.3​
17​
34.6​
2.3​
2.3​
18​
36.6​
3.3​
3.3​
19​
38.7​
4.3​
4.3​
20​
40.7​
5.3​
5.3​
21​
42.8​
6.3​
6.3​
22​
44.8​
7.3​
7.3​
23​
46.8​
8.3​
8.3​
24​
48.9​
9.3​
9.3​
25​
50.9​
10.3​
10.3​
26​
52.9​
11.3​
11.3​
27​
55.0​
12.3​
12.3​
28​
57.0​
13.3​
13.3​
29​
59.0​
14.3​
14.3​
30​
61.1​
15.3​
15.3​
31​
63.1​
16.3​
16.3​
32​
65.2​
17.3​
17.3​
33​
67.2​
18.3​
18.3​
34​
69.2​
19.3​
19.3​
34​
69.2​
19.3​
19.3​
36​
73.3​
21.3​
21.3​
37​
75.3​
22.3​
22.3​
38​
77.4​
23.3​
23.3​
39​
79.4​
24.3​
24.3​
40​
81.4​
25.3​
25.3​
41​
83.5​
26.3​
26.3​
42​
85.5​
27.3​
27.3​
43​
87.5​
28.3​
28.3​
44​
89.6​
29.3​
29.3​
45​
91.6​
30.3​
30.3​

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
 

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