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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It is now time. For a quick history, go here:

http://www.musclemustangfastfords.com/features/0410mm_ford_muscle_car_comparison/index.html

That was before my daughter was born (she's now in kindergarten), just after I broke my back, and the "girlfriend" mentioned in the article became my wife, then crazy wife and now crazy ex-wife. I have become a single full-time working dad - much has happened. Now that the dust is settling, I have decided its time to do what all good men in my position do - resurrect a project from the past. Some time ago, I put together a little video of the car's Eaton M90 legacy; it's here:


Best pass with the M90 - 11.43 @ 119 mph.

I had pulled the major pieces together about 5 years ago (special thanks to the guy who gave me the M112 from a Jag - you know who you are; and as promised, your identity remains a secret); they've been sitting around, along with discharge plate and adapter plate I cut out and the Terminator TB ever since (thanks to Brian Bossone, former owner of ELD Performance for the throttle body). I started this assembly process about a week and a half ago; the goal is to make an M112 boosted pass this season. So let's get on with how to hack together a bunch of junk to make another bunch of junk that much faster (note: the LTD's engine bay is virtually identical to a fox mustang's - and it's a 5.0 to boot).

Here's the first mockup:




My brother, Mark, decided to come by and have some fun with my cheapie Harbor Freight flux-core mig:




Here's a couple of shots of the tacked together mockup:





A day or two later, I found some time to finish up the welds. Notice the exceptionally crappy weld at the front of the discharge - that was an attempt to fix one of 4 pinhole leaks. I've since abandoned the idea, and will do the grind/jb weld trick to make it look smooth. That should seal the leaks, and look better, too.




Here's a better look at the discharge tube. Two notes: no comments about the sleeping bag that I'm using as my work surface, please. It belonged to the crazy ex when she was a kid; I've discovered it catches fire pretty easily. The other note: see the ugly weld along the bottom seam? I guess you win some and you lose some. The top was really nice. This one... well, not so nice.





Moving on - things are starting to take shape! It rained the night before, and I left the stuff outside. It rusts fast, doesn't it?




Let's take a closer look at that belt routing:






Uh-oh. Hit a little snag. Did you notice the tensioner I'm using? It's an idler pulley from a 1990 Lincoln Town Car and a tensioner arm from some mystery junkyard car I had pulled years ago. The bearings in the pulley were shot. If I have to buy a new one, might as well get an 8 rib (as opposed to a 6). Well, looky here: an Econoline E350 with a 7.3L Diesel uses an 8 rib belt. I stopped at Autozone on my way home from work today and picked one up. Cost almost $30 - this is getting expensive (total target cost: no mare than $250 - this includes everything - expendables (grinding wheels, sanding drums, etc), tools (so far, an electric die grinder from Harbor Freight, some Lincoln welding wire, and one home-made deal you're about to see), the belt, supercharger oil; everything.

I put the thing together and realized I had to press the bearing about 1/8" further out to get it to clear. Made a really trick idler pulley bering press. It's the last picture below. I'll let you figure out how it works (if you really want to know, I'll tell you). I can say it works like a dream.






Another little snag - since I had nothing to bolt the plates to while welding, they warped. I dug out a rusty old iron SBF head, found some holes that lined up with the holes in the plate, put in some old automotive bolts, stuck an impact socket between to the plate and the head (at the high spots) and tightened the bolts. Pulled the plates *almost* straight. Believe it or not, this amount of misalignment is enough to cause the rotors to just touch the case when the bolts are tightened:




I'll be off to Mark's house (he owns a large belt sander - should get the plates close enough to perfect). I've also made a temporary air filter setup (it's 30% undersized, according to K&N; and I'm in danger of "collapsing" the air filter - whatever that means). I've also completely finished the front plate - painted and everything. Looks surprisingly decent.

More to come soon...
 

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Interesting:), can't wait to see the finished product. How much boost do you think it will make?
 

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man, that flux wire weld is not what I expected - but it looks like it will hold after grinding. Gas shield MIG is the way to go. Good luck!
Those aren't typical of a flux core weld (I've got pictures of some really nice ones that I've made but I won't post them here), he's having a combination of a few problems there (that we've found so far):
- the switch on the welder is wonky and sometimes it sorts of clicks on and off, you can here the feed starting and stopping and you get an especially crappy weld
- Power supply problems, when you get it running a little hotter it starts blowing breakers- I've got a solution for that but he hasn't gotten parts and I haven't looked if I have what he needs in the basement yet
- that little welder just doesn't have enough power to make a proper weld puddle- when you're welding and doing it right you're feeding wire into the molten weld puddle, in this case the heavier plate is sucking up the heat so fast that there is no puddle you're just sort of sticking together metal

You might be able to get that thing to lay down a proper looking bead on something that heavy, but I suspect that it would take a lot of preheat from a propane torch and I didn't really think it was worth the effort at the time (I kind of thought that we were going to tack it together and then end up finishing it at my house with a bigger welder).
 

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A good MIG welder would have no problems welding that.

You can pick up a 110V 100A Lincoln welder for around $200-250 used. 230V ones go for a little more, used.


Looks like a good project with a healthy amount of fabrication work! I like it.
 

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Southern rigging at it's finest! I love it. Prototyping is fun and making it work is just frosting on the cake.....
Good job!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
There seems to be some discussion on the welds; but first, I'll answer some questions:

blue351lx - I think it'll make about 10-12 psi; based on the fact that I saw 8.4 psi peak out of the M90; this blower will be spinning slower; but it's bigger, three generations newer and doesn't have a million miles on it.

seawalkersee - Yeah, I'm old.

sick96gt - thanks!

garycrist - umm... dunno what to say (I'm originally from NY, but now live south of the Mason Dixon...)

qtrracer - yes, they did; but it was inefficient and used the same small blower I ran the 11.43 with. This new one goes up to 11.

About the welding - a poor workman always blames their tools. I'm neither poor nor a workman, and I've never blamed my tool. The welder probably isn't great, the bigger problem is the lack of power in the garage currently. I could only lay down a decent bead for 2-3 inches before blowing the breaker. Probably the biggest problem was my lack of experience. Bill Gibson, the guy who tig'd up the first blower bracket is a welding god - he would just look at the metal and it would lay down and beg. I'm not Bill. But I did manage to get a couple of decent looking beads. The welder throws out more than enough heat for this job. He's a closeup of one of the better welds (still has some splatter, but the trick with flux core is to keep the tip as close as possible to the work) - it kinda resembles the coveted stack-of-dimes, if you squint really hard. You can also see where the breaker blew:




Moving on. Tried the big belt sander, didn't really do much (heat/contraction issues). I took it back home and bent the plate some more. I am that strong. With c-clamps, anyway. But while having the assembly at Mark's, I decided to take advantage of his psychotic garage, and do some (admittedly gratuitous) cleanup work. Here's Mark on the mill:




Here's an amusing (but subtley racist) warning I spied on one of the pieces of machinery in his garage:




Besides - what crappy welds are you guys talking about?




The secret: JB Stik. This stuff is harder than John Holmes after a six month dry spell. I had to go out and buy some better sandpaper to finish it off, as my stock on hand literally wouldn't cut it. It's alot less epoxy than you'd think - the entire thing took less than 2 oz. of the stuff - literally a skim pass (you can see some of the weld poking through).



Almost there!

PS - Love me some Rustoleum Hammertone!
 

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that thing gives me a chub and i'm following this
 

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NOTHING better then going fast on a budget having fun
 

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killer finishing job w/ the JB

I have that same welder and access to a nicer $500 lincoln mig. they are night and day. I know I suck at welding but the harbor freight one is very unforgiving. it does however get the job done for most quick fab jobs on the driveway, which is what I bought it for.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
90MarkVII - there is no rear support. wysiwyg. It's strong. Really, really strong. I can tell you I can't move the front snout (when the snout is unsupported) at all. I'll also post a pic of the M90 bracket.

A bit of a teaser - I bolted the thing on the car yesterday, and turned the ignition key. I'll show you what happened either through interpretive dance or videos/pics. I'm not in a position to do it at the moment, hopefully I'll get around to it later tonight.

Stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
As promised, here we go. If you want to cut to the chase to see what happened when I went to start the car, scroll towards the end of this post and watch the last video. But here's how I got there:

When I looked at the porting work on the adapter plate that I did years ago, I realized I left alot of work on the table. I had to remove a ton of material to shape the internal area properly. Safety note: do not use an HSS spiral cutting bit designed for wallboard in an electric die grinder when porting aluminum. It cuts really, really fast. And when it grabs the aluminum too hard, it takes the die grinder on a tour of the interior circumference of whatever you're working on at warp factor 9. Then it breaks the bit, and launches it at the speed of sound at whatever's nearby. I didn't learn this the first time. So I used a second bit.






Here's what things really look like while in progress:




Here's a shot of the complete "kit":




Of course, I had drained the blower years ago, so I had to take it apart to check things out, and refill it. Here's what the gear area looks like:




Here's the assembled "kit":




Here's what it looks like installed:






As 90MarkVII asked for a shot of the bracket on the old M90, and it happened to be sitting on the garage floor at the time, here you go (you can tell it hasn't been run in a while):




Before we get to the result, here's a little video about a nifty trick I discovered while cleaning out the blower with a shop vac:

Now on YouTube!


And, finally, what happened when I turned the key:


Alas, as cool as that was, all is not wine and roses in Shangri-La. You can't tell from the pics or videos (but you do hear the accessory belt squealing like a stuck pig - I've since tightened that up), but the snout of the blower isn't actually resting on the front plate, and the u-bolt won't pull it down (with a reasonable amount of force, anyway) - it's about 1/8" up in the air. What's holding it up? I'm glad you asked. I had to run a piece of paper between the blower assembly and the passenger side valve cover to find out. I found a couple of points of interference. So out comes the BFH and an impact socket, and I beat the valve cover into submission - almost. Until I realized there were a few dimples that wouldn't go down, and those dimples were - ahem - the poly locks for the rockers. Oops.

No harm, no foul. All is fixable. I need to bevel the bottom edge of the discharge plate (and then, unfortunately, re-paint it). I also need to machine down the 4 poly locks in the area about 1/8" - I hope I can do that without too much fuss - anyone have any experience with that? Then I'll need to beat the valve cover straight (lowered in the appropriate area) and refinish it (hammertone, of course!)

I also need to pull the upper intake off and plug the EGR port so I can run a cork gasket at the TB opening - anyone have any good ideas on how to plug it? With the interference mentioned above, the two surfaces didn't line up perfectly, and exhaust gases were leaking out at the bottom. While I have the upper intake off, and since I just won an ebay auction for a set of Explorer valve covers (virtually the same as the current passenger side VC) for 99 cents (yay!) but with $11 shipping (boo! - but not the seller's fault, I suppose) and they should be here tomorrow or Friday, I'll make up the driver's side valve cover with an oil filler. Betcha didn't notice that there's currently not one on the car - see the above pics. Then the VC's should match and I'll finally be able to easily change the oil (after about three years).

Once all that's done and everything goes back together, all that's left is to fix a bit of runout on the blower tensioner pulley, make a throttle cable bracket, get a properly-sized drive belt, go over the EFI tune, take it to the track and blow it all up. Hopefully, I'll get most of that done this weekend...

Oh, I forgot to mention - I can't close the hood by about 1/8" - the blower pulley hits. But I have a surprisingly easy and old-school fix for that - I'll share when I do it.
 
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