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Discussion Starter #1
I just put my new Dart 331 in my 88GT with a S-Trim. I ran the car about 30 miles and changed the oil. I never got into the boost or took it over 4000 rpms yet. How long do you think I should wait to hammer it? Also I have a new spec stage 3 clutch - what would be the proper way to break that in?
Jim
 

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I was told by Ed C. to stay out of boost for 500miles, then hammer it!
I waited....oh, about 50miles before getting into boost. Couldn't help it! Car got significantly faster after ~700miles.

At 500 miles change the oil again.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. Yeah, I'm gonna TRY to stay out off it till I get a couple hundred miles on it. I really need to just baby it and drive it everywhere for alittle while and get some miles on it. Any recommendations on the weight of oil that I should use? I put 10-30 in it to start. I'll stick with conventional oil until at least (1000?) miles, then I'll change to Mobil 1 synthetic.
Jim
 

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Everyone says a roller motor needs about the first five minutes or so to seat the rings then you can start beating it but I've always started set timing and stuff check for leaks then change oil, run for about 500 miles w/regular oil then change to synthetic and enjoy. Haven't had any problems yet with past two motors.
 

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I agree with Joe, but you want to see all different RPM ranges not just highway miles. Good luck.
 

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The clutch...

The answer to the clutch question is as you are letting the motor break in at the 500+ mile range, the clutch will be seated as well at that recommended mile range as well. Just don't try and drag it like a stock clutch.

I have the Stage III and gave it a solid 500 miles and it has been a good clutch so far with that break in time. It originally had chatter but went away as the miles racked up on it.

Good luck with the new motor and all, Brent.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So you think I should run the engine through the RPM's in some stop and go driving to break it in? Sounds good. What about the clutch? Should I run the clutch through the RPM's to break it in, or should I do some 5000 rpms holeshots? Or just take it easy for the first couple hundred miles?

BTW: I think I might have to take the blower belt off to avoid the temptation of getting into the boost.

Jim
 

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you are good to go right now with that motor. 30 miles plus an oil change on a roller motor. you can wait 500 miles if you want, but your motor will not be any more broken in.
most catastrophic engine failure is going to occur within 5 minutes of start-up (for a new roller motor)

...i do suggest you wait 500 miles to really hammer it but that is because of your new clutch. take it easy, with NO holeshots. your clutch will reward you with smooth, consistent engagement for miles to come.

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I TOOK THE BLOWER BELT OFF!

I couldn't stand it anymore - I drove the car to work today and it is just awesome - I felt the need to really lay into it. I actually creeped into the boost alittle -about 5# in 3rd gear spinning. I couldn't resist the temptation - I felt like a crack friend! So I came home and removed the blower belt - now if I get tempted, I won't hurt anything with boost. I was suprised, the car drives pretty well w/o the belt. LOL

Jim
 

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what exactly will you hurt with boost? your rings are
99.99999999 % seated and you have a roller cam. put the belt back on.;)
 

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As has been suggested here, on a roller motor you can choose to push it pretty hard after a very short break-in period. It is unlikely that this will cause any major failures. However, I believe there iare real benefits to patient and thoughtful break-in of all mechanical components. Here's what I do to try to give a new engine every chance for optimum performance and longevity:

Pre-lube by running the oil pump with an electric drill for a full minute after the gauge shows oil pressure. Get distributor timing as close as possible before starting. Try to set everything up properly so the engine starts quickly without extended cranking. Check and adjust timing immediately upon starting. On a roller motor, I keep rpm between 1500-2500 rpm for the first ten minutes or so, then vary it between 1500-3500 rpm for another ten minutes or so. Watch for overheating; don't allow it.

Shut down, allow everything to cool completely. Change oil. Check critical torque on engine fasteners. Look for small leaks.

Restart, and after brief, fast-idle warm-up, drive the car around in stop and go fashion for around 15 minutes. Avoid heavy throttle and higher rpms. Verify full operating temperature.

Within the first 50 miles of operation, to insure optimum ring seating, you want to make several high-load pulls. The trick is to create some sustained, high cylinder pressure without creating excessive bearing loads or engine heat. From a rolling start in perhaps 3rd gear, at around 1500-2200 rpm (depending on how "wild" you cam is) ease the throttle open, allowing the engine to wind up to ~4000 rpm. Then, leaving it in gear, release the throttle completely and let it coast back down to ~1500 rpm.

Drive a few more minutes, then repeat the drill. If you car is geared very low, you may need to do this in 4th gear instead of 3rd. Avoid wheel spin. Repeat this drill 3 or 4 times within the first 50 miles, making sure you release the throttle and let it coast down after each pull. Then drive the car with moderate throttle and moderate, varying rpm (not highway droning) for the next 500 miles or so.

Although it is not likely that parts will break in a well-built motor without this extended break-in, there is some work-hardening of metals that occurs on critical surfaces like rod and crank journals, piston skirts, valve stem tips, etc. Allowing them to come to fullest metal strength and surface to surface fit prior to stressing them is just a cheap and simple insurance policy.

What the multiple-pull, moderate rpm drill accomplishes is to fully and optimally seat the rings, using high cylinder pressure while the hone marks in the cylinder have enough "bite" to lap them in. This lapping-in under pressure will inevitably create some extra heat; releasing the throttle after each pull creates vacuum in the cylinders, which pulls oil up around the rings and provides a cooling effect. It also helps cool and prevents scuffing of the cylinder walls and piston skirts.

I know this drill and patient break-in takes a few hours of your driving time. I also know that sometimes people go out and wail on their new motors right away, and nothing breaks. But ask yourself, how much time and money have you invested up to the point that you first fire up that new motor? I find it a small price to pay to insure optimum performance, durability, and longevity.

Steve A.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Steve,
Excellent reply, thanks for taking the time to go over that for me. I actually did almost exactly what you said to do so far. I think the only difference is that I changed the oil after the initial drive (about 35 miles)

Once again - thanks for the reply,
Jim
 

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We have a 1200 hp all aluminum 408 roller motor in a late model, the guy that builds are motor said that all any engine needs is to started and help at above 2000 rpms for 10 minutes or until operating temp, then let cool completely down, restart and get to op temp then shes ready to be hammered. We have run his engine for 5 years and have broke mine in the same way and have had 0 engine failures.
Just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quick update:

I now have over 100 miles on the new engine. I had a small fuel leak two injectors - I'm lucky that I did not have a fire. I figured something was seriously wrong when I went through a whole tank of gas in 75 miles:eek: . I fixed that last night with some new o-rings. I've got it tuned pretty good right now - idle is rock solid at 900 rpms, good vacuume (about 14" at idle), my mark 8/ 31 x 19 alum radiator combo is awesome for cooling. Even with the blower belt off, it is still an animal when I get on it. I am very impressed. The car even cold starts and idles perfect, i used to have to baby it for a couple minutes untill it warmed up. I drove it to church last night - now that I have insurance and registation on it. It still isn't inspected - but i'll get that in a week or two. Stand by for BOOST!

Jim
 
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