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During our 2 year at-home stint, I found it difficult to get the kind of leg workout I wanted in the garage. Noticed my knees would start to complain every now and again. Got back in the gym in April --- restarted my leg work. Within 2 weeks, all knee complaints gone. And upped yoga to twice a week. As Richard alluded to - use it or lose it.

What really gets me Richard is the number of garages that are built with framing/drywall so close to the garage door shaft that you can't slide it one way or the other to remove/replace springs, bearings, cable hubs, etc. You have to unbolt the whole mechanism from the wall and take it down -- work on it on the floor, and then re-install it. PITA. Luckily, my garage is not that way.
That goes along with the physical size of the garages. Most are barely 20' deep. Length of most SUV and trucks? Just under 20'. My truck will fit with literally an inch on either end.

I don't think house plans have increased garage size in twenty plus years. Yet vehicles are bigger and bigger. Hadn't thought about the side to side clearance, but not surprised. In our hunt for a house plan, I have seen a few with bigger garages, though. Typically deeper on maybe one bay, with that deeper part being a "workshop" area.

My home garage has a 16' entry door. If you pull both cars straight in, barely enough room to open a car door and get out in most cars. My truck would be a no-go. My garage is 21' wide and 20' deep. If I knew then what I know now, I'd have gone at least 24' deep and 24 wide with two entry doors. Plus a 3' walk in door in between them. Plenty of room that way.
 
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Yup, spot on Richard. Our attached garage here is only 20' deep. We drive small cars. They fit - but you have to put them in just the right spot to have room behind as we have some stuff on the wall in front of them. Full size SUV/Truck - forget it I think. When we built in Knoxville, we built a 24'x30'. 30' wide gives plenty of room for a work bench. And at 24' deep, I actually had room to park the motorcycle in front of the car. Separate doors is easier on the openers too.
 

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Chris - a while back we talked about the value of vintage Bugattis. Check this out. As you're looking at the engine (straight 8) - like Offenhauser, the block/head is machined out of one chunk of metal. No head gasket -- so no head gasket failures. That's part of what allowed the old 4 cylinder turbocharged Offy engines in Indy cars to run insane amounts of boost. https://www.hemmings.com/classified...ail&utm_source=daily_marketplace#&gid=1&pid=1
 

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Wow thanks for sharing that site. I had no idea one could use NO gasket before this discussion. Great machining no doubt for the day. What a beauty.

Side question, just how much boost did they run??
 

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I think you may have misunderstood/I wasn't clear Chris. No gasket because the head and block are all one piece -- the head is not a separate piece that has to be bolted on.

The old Offy's in the final iterations made 1000HP out of 168 cubes at 45 psig in qualifying trim; dialed back to about 750HP for the race. It's called "mono bloc" construction. 2.75L 4 cylinder

Of course, the BMW F1 1.5L (about 90 cubic inches) cars from the late 80's made 1200-1500HP in qualifying trim. They actually used the factory 1.5L OEM blocks first created in the mid-60's. Bolt on head with what must've been metal o'ringed cylinders to hold the boost. I saw them run in Mexico City in the late 80's. You can't imagine the acceleration. The rumor was that the BMW dyno only went to 1280HP, so the 1350, 1400, 1500 HP were estimates by BMW engineers based on cranking in more boost. Up to 80 psig.

And then there's nitromethane.....whole different animal. Top Fuel - 500 cubes, 45.5 psig, estimates from 9,000-11,000 HP.
 
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Before the 3 second Top Fuel cars came along, the Space Shuttle was faster(MPH) in the quarter mile. I think it took 33 seconds to get that high, but it was moving very fast by then.
 

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Chris - a while back we talked about the value of vintage Bugattis. Check this out. As you're looking at the engine (straight 8) - like Offenhauser, the block/head is machined out of one chunk of metal. No head gasket -- so no head gasket failures. That's part of what allowed the old 4 cylinder turbocharged Offy engines in Indy cars to run insane amounts of boost. https://www.hemmings.com/classified...ail&utm_source=daily_marketplace#&gid=1&pid=1
Wow, that's a new one on me. Had no idea. So, how were valves and such accessed? Wait, I guess this was before OHV motors were even around.
 

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Thanks for the correction Michael, I misread your email.

I also noted the Bugatti seemed to have positive camber on the front wheels. Any idea why they ran it like that versus slight negative camber I am running these days?
 

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I'm guessing the camber changed significantly when the wheel was turned or suspension was being worked while turning. I imagine it was a bit twitchy on straights though. LOL

Makes me think of the old tractors with the single side by side wheels on the front end. Their wheels were always positive camber as well.
 
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From someone on Jalopyjournal that seems to know of what they speak....seems there were several reasons for it. With modern roads/race tracks (very little crown, relatively speaking) and modern tires - the set up would be different today.


"There were a few reasons for it. One of the most quoted had to do with the high crown and heavy ruts of the roads back then. With a beam axle there is very little camber change during suspension travel, especially when both wheels bump up (camber change only happens when one wheel travels more than the other). In heavy ruts the positive camber helped keep the car in the ruts, as versus climbing out and getting all sideways on the road. It also helped to counteract bump steer issues (and the dreaded death wobble) as well as creating much lighter steering effort. With the narrow tires and round profile, camber was of little or no benefit to cornering forces.
It has been said that Mercedes, during the early 1900’s would actually measure the crown in a road when doing endurance racing and set the positive camber to match as it made the cars more stable at speed.
One other thing to consider is wheel bearing loads and the technology in the early days. Have you ever noticed how the inner bearing is larger than the outer? Well on these really early cars it is even more so. By putting positive camber in the wheel the load is directed more towards the inner bearing. The vertical load is more direct with the inner bearing and this kept them from snapping off spindles which was a problem early on."
 

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Very interesting!
 

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Well…. It seems the radiator (cheap chineseum aluminum sort of alloy) I bought 30k miles ago has a small leak, likely in the welded fin/pass side tank area where some strange blackish corrosion seems to be occurring. It was a $200 ish rad purchase a few years ago after I got tired of installing new plastic side tank radiators that cost $150 and only lasted 50k miles.

Looks like I’ve proven you get what you paid for again. The cheap plastic ones last longer. I went thru two of those in my Jeep ownership now of about 150k miles. I was hoping the china all welded versions were better. Nope. So I bought a new plastic side Frank version yesterday from PartsGeek to be delivered Sat. I’ll remove the whole front end again on the Jeep to do the radiator. And I was SO happy with the fan install etc. Oh well. I think the vibration/ manhandling of engine install event likely contributed to the brittle fracture I expect to find.

It’s not fun pulling all the front end off and massaging the rad out from between the hydraulic rad fan system and the condenser etc….. but this will be my third maybe fourth time so i should be good at it by now.

It’s always something huh?

Planted base and Recaro sliders should be in maybe next week and that’ll be a FUN install To make up for the cuts and skimmed knuckles on sharp rad/confessor fins that I expect to earn.
 

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Yea and I did check Griffin. They have one for $1025 ish. A Beauty I am sure! I may get that next but discretionary income at present won’t allow that after the Jasper engine.

The custom Griffin I bought on my Mustang was top end available 22 years ago and it’s held on PERFECTLY of course. The Jeep may get one next go around.
 
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