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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some searching and kept running into the issues with the aftermarket throttle cables for the injected V8 cars. Some had gone the route of building their own and through reading what they had done I decided it was time to try it. I did this over two years ago and it is still working and has not failed.

So I took the plunge and ordered the 36” long Lokar cable (P/N TC-1000U36) and Spectre Performance 4700 return spring set off Amazon. What you end up doing is removing the clevis off the accelerator pedal end of the Lokar cable. You do this by sliding the cable out of the housing and then sliding the clevis off the cable. From here you install the end off the factory cable but you have to cut the factory cable to get it off. Slide the end on the Lokar cable and reassemble. You will need to trim the Lokar cable to fit as I believe the factory one is around 32” long.

Some guys use the piece on the factory cable the bolts to the firewall and slide the Lokar cable into it. To do this it is my understanding the you cannot use the SS braided version of the Lokar cable.

The end on the Lokar cable that receives a ball will snap directly onto the TB. What I wanted to figure out is how to attach the cruise control cable as well. The cruise didn't work at that time so it was "I'll get to it later” kind of project but I ended up addressing it and it worked out really well. Enough of the intro and lets get to the project.

You will need to attach a return spring to the opposite side of the TB lever (kick down cable side) and then back to the throttle cable bracket as the Lokar cable does not have a built in one like the factory cable.

Again, I did some lurking on several Mustang sites to get the info. All the searches were turning up carb cable related threads as few have replaced their EFI cable but mine was starting to become an issue.

So here is how you make a proper cable and again I did this a couple of years ago on my Coupe and can say that it is 100% better and I should have done it about three years prior. Remove the stock throttle cable and it should look something like this:



From here you need to cut the wire rope out of the sheath and save the little green plug on the wire rope that pops into the gas pedal as we will use that here in a bit. Discard the rest of the wire rope. On the sheath cut off and save the end that attaches to the firewall and toss the rest. You will need to remove the rest of the cable down in the fitting. I used a 3/16 drill bit and a little at a time removed the bits and pieces. Double check the 3/16" as you do not want to drill out the hole any larger than what it is on the passenger compartment side of this fitting. I tried to remove it with a punch but that was futile as it just waded up in the fitting and wasted time. Once you have it removed then you will want to step up in drill bit sizes to 1/4" (OD of the new throttle cable sheath) and drill the engine bay side out about 3/4" deep. This will allow you to slip the new throttle cable sheath down into this fitting.

So now you have the green plastic plug and the firewall fitting. Take the 36” long Lokar cable (P/N TC-1000U36) and removed the wire rope from the sheath. One fitting will slide off the sheath so take that off and set it and the ferrule type tube to the side. The other fitting is attached to the sheath with some kind of crimp so I cut that fitting of flush with the sheath. I cleaned that end up (don't do this as you will end up shortening the sheath some more.

Now take the end that slipped on the sheath and install it into the throttle cable bracket that attaches to the throttle body like this:



Install the firewall fitting back on the firewall and then insert the factory end of the Lokcar sheath into that fitting (you should have checked the fit prior to this...) and it should look like this:



Route the sheath like you would your throttle cable and then hold it up to the fitting you installed on the throttle cable bracket on the throttle body. This is where you are going to cut the sheath to length. I ended up cutting 5" off mine but this is a custom fit thing so you may want to verify what works on a Fox Mustang work on our cars. Remove the sheath and cut it to length. I used a dremel with a cut off wheel and that worked very well. I removed the firewall fitting and then put that on the sheath.

Next you will need to slide the green plastic fitting onto the Lokar wire rope. One end has a round end and mine was painted red. I installed the green plastic fitting and did not like the looks of things in that I thought a couple of quick throttle mashes and the red end might pull through the green plastic fitting. I rummaged through the shop and found some really small washers so I installed two of those on the wire rope and then put the green plastic fitting back on and was satisfied. I forgot to take a picture of this out of the car so I dropped the gas pedal and snapped one.



Here is the washer that I put on the cable. I put it on a tape measure so you can get an idea of how small it is.


Now reinsert the wire rope with the washers and green plastic fitting on it into the passenger compartment side of the firewall fitting and through the sheath. Install the assembly onto the firewall and again route it to the throttle body bracket. Pass the wire rope through the ferrule type tube and slide the ferrule type tube onto the end of the sheath. Now slide all of this into and through the fitting bolted to the throttle body bracket. You should have way more wire rope than you need at this point.

Here is the thing that I highly suggest you do and that is to make a 1/4" spacer that will go between the gas pedal bracket that bolts to the firewall and the firewall. I made mine out of 5 -1/2" long 1-1/2" wide piece of aluminum strap. Had to radius the lower right hand corner and over drill the holes to 5/16". This gets the puppies pedal off the carpet and allows the WOT stop built into the stock gas pedal assembly to actually hit before contacting the carpet. This will allow easier adjustment of this cable assembly.

Install the gas pedal and attach the throttle cable to the pedal. You can slide the wire rope out of the sheath a ways and once the pedal is installed pull it back through. We will adjust the cable on WOT only as the return spring will set the idle position.

Remove the threaded ball from the end of the Lokar piece that will snap onto the ball of the throttle body lever. The only picture I have of this piece is when I was making sure it would snap into the throttle cable clip which is the piece of plastic that connects the throttle cable to the cruise control cable. So yes you can keep your cruise control doing this my way.



Note: this piece has some tension adjustment via the threads so put them in the middle.

Snap just the Lokar piece onto the throttle body lever. I took a small zip tie and loosely zip tied the wire rope to this piece so I could measure how long the wire rope needed to be. Do realize that over an inch of this cable will slip up into this piece and my advise would be to cut it longer than you think you need. Cut the wire rope to length and insert the end of it into the piece that attaches to the throttle body. The fun part is holding the throttle body at WOT so you can screw down the set screw at this point. I ended up taking the inlet tube off the throttle body and having someone hold the blade as that made more room down where you need to tighten up the small F'n set screw.

Okay, so now we have WOT throttle pretty much set. Now you will need to install the return spring. I used the smaller diameter inner spring from the Spectre Performance 4700 throttle return spring set and it worked perfect. You will attach this through the throttle cable screw hole on the throttle body bracket and then into the auto trans kick down hole on the throttle body lever. IF you have an auto trans you will need to remove your throttle body and drill a small hole somewhere on this lever on the kick down cable side so this will work correctly. When done it will look like this:





Okay, now we have a completely functioning throttle cable but you need to make sure that when the gas pedal is WOT the throttle body is WOT. I did a reset on the throttle position sensor and glad I did. At idle (car not running but key in the run position) I was getting 1.064 volts on the DVM. I adjusted the TPS and got it down to 0.964 volts...good enough. When the gas pedal was pushed to WOT I got 4.41 volts and I pushed on the throttle body blade and it went to 4.6 volts. I removed the part that snaps onto the ball on the throttle body lever and used the threads on it to fine tune WOT.

Last thing is here is the cruise control cable connected to my new throttle cable and yes it works just fine.



The only thing I will caution on is to leave the braided cable about 1" longer than you think you need it when cutting it. The barrel piece that snaps on to the throttle body is hollow and will accept quite a bit of the cable. Better to not cut too much than have to order anther expensive cable and worse have to wait on it.
 

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Thanks for the detailed write-up! This is something I've been thinking about doing for a while, but have never tried to tackle the job. With my engine set back an inch on an MM K-member, plus EGR delete, the stock throttle cable is too long. To bolt the mounting bracket onto the EGR delete spacer I really have to force it into place, and that's even with using some studs and thick nuts as spacers to move the bracket out a bit.


End result is that the throttle cable loops up and is jammed back against the firewall, doesn't seem to line up with the throttle linkage properly (which I think sometimes causes the throttle blade to not return to idle properly), and it looks stupid.


It sounds like the Lokar cable is cut to length, so I could line it up more betterer and hopefully get a smoother operation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The cable is 36” long and cut to length so hopefully that solves your issue.

I chose not to set the motor back on the MM k-member in my car as it’s primarily street and it’s already tight back there so I definitely see your point.
 
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