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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so I think I've got a little piston slap going on in the passenger side of the engine. It's not terrible and goes away after the car is warmed up, but if I nail the gas, it will burn oil like mad. So my guess is that the rings are bad, but I'm not a mechanic. I will be stripping the motor down in the next few weeks anyways and was thinking about possibly having the cylinder/cylinders re-honed and/or re-bored as to fix the slap and hopefully the excessive oil burn (I will be buying new rings too). I'm hoping that just getting it re-honed will do the trick as I want to keep the stock pistons. Is this a good idea or what should I do? I will be changing the stock heads to GT40P's so my compression may go up a bit and I'm worried it may progress the slapping. I don't think it will cost too much to get the machine work done as I will just bring the block in if I decide to do it. I just am no professional, so what should I do?:confused:
 

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You can either send the engine out to a machine shop, and have them determine how worn the engine is, and go from there, OR

tear it apart yourself, and use micrometers to measure everything. All the proper measurement tools will run you north of $1,000 if you get quality ones.
 

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bluestreak, IF it's a piston slap you're hearing, I don't recommend this, but if money is tight, you can often get away with a poorman's rebuild. You didn't give any specifics, so I'll assume you've got over 100k miles on that short block. Usually this will mean the stock rings have eaten a nice bit into the cylinder walls and you'll have a bit of a lip at the top of the cylinder. If there's little to no lip a poorman's rebuild is a great option, if there's a big lip, it's still an option, just not the best one.
Now a poorman's rebuild is going to have you do a cheap rebuild of the entire lower end without boring it. I recommend you use cast rings, this will allow them to wear down to fit your probably oblong cylinders much easier. I've seen these types of rebuilds done several times, and while they're not always the best option, they will keep your car on the road.
IMHO, with any strange noises, it would be a VERY good idea to take your entire rotating assembly to a qualified shop and have it inspected and rebalanced.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Slo. That is kinda what I had in mind because money is veryyy tight. I've been doing research on it and I hear every where that a little piston slap is normal for a car with 180k on it. It goes away very quickly and doesn't even happen all the time (only when it's really cold). I do plan on rebuilding it, just not yet, so I think I'm going to let it do its thing for now until I can build up the necessary funds to do it right.
 

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.....removing that slap (and the higher startup emissions that accompany it) is but one of the reasons Ford moved to a cast hypereutectic piston late in 92. The cast pistons are much more thermally stable than the forged units allowing a much tigher piston to cylinder fitment.
 
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